Courses & Programs

Computer User Support

Casimir Storozuk

Faculty, Computer Information Systems

Business and Technology

Kittredge Center 505

413.552.2429 (Tel)


What will you learn?

This two-year degree program prepares students to enter the field of Computer User Support in an entry level position and to take Industry Certification Exams such as A+.

PROGRAM OUTCOMES

Upon graduating from this program, students will be able to:

  • Work on the technical aspects of maintaining, troubleshooting and repairing computer and network systems.
  • Begin an entry level career as a network manager, "help desk" technician, microcomputer technician or information support personnel.
  • Build the technical, managerial, and inter-personal skills to succeed in avariety of business and Information Technology settings.

What will you do?

Transfer to a four-year college or university, or go right into the workforce! Job and career options include:

  • Support Technician
  • Network Administrator
  • Systems Maintenance
  • Network Security Analyst

Explore your options at HCC's Advising, Career and Transfer Center, or at What Can I Do With This Major?

60-62 total credits

20 credits General Education Requirements + 30-32 credits Program Requirements

Depending on course selection, 50% of this program can be completed online.


General Education Requirements

20 CREDITS
This course is the first half of the college composition sequence and focuses on close reading, critical thinking, beginning research skills, and the writing process. Students will read, analyze, and cite a range of nonfiction texts. Students will produce several formal essays totaling approximately 3000 words. Prerequisite: Appropriate scores on English placement tests or C- or higher in ENG 095.
This course is the second half of the first-year composition sequence and focuses on close reading, critical thinking, academic writing, research, and the writing process. Students will locate and evaluate both primary and secondary sources, and will gain skill in summarizing and synthesizing source material while employing MLA documentation. Texts will include a range of nonfiction (articles, essays, scholarly sources) and literary works. Students will produce at least 3000 words of formal written work, including a documented essay of at least 1250 words. Prerequisite: ENG 101 with a grade of C-or higher.
Select from the following courses: ANT 101, ANT 103, ANT 110, ANT 114, ANT 120, ANT 130, ANT 150, ANT 250, COM 212, CRJ 110, CRJ 117, CRJ 200, CRJ 208, CRJ 209, CRJ 210, CRJ 217, ECN 100, ECN 101, ECN 102, ECN 104, ECN 105, ECN 120, ECN150, ECN 250, GEO 110, GRT 110, HON 206, HSV 120, HSV 205, HSV 208, HSV 212, HSV 226, HSV 230, LAW 215, POL 101, POL 110, POL 120, POL 125, POL 126, POL 140, POL 150, POL 230, PSY 110, PSY 202, PSY 203, PSY 210, PSY 215, PSY 216, PSY 217, PSY 218, PSY 220, PSY 222, PSY 224, PSY 225, PSY 226, PSY 230, PSY 233, PSY 240, PSY 242, PSY 250, PSY 260, PSY 265, PSY 270, SOC 110, SOC 130, SOC 150, SOC 204, SOC 208, SOC 213, SOC 214, SOC 215, SOC 216, SOC 220, SOC 240, SOC250, SSN 120, SSN 230, WST 100, WST 215, WST 217
Select from the following courses: ANT 101, ANT 103, ANT 110, ANT 114, ANT 120, ANT 130, ANT 150, ANT 250, COM 212, CRJ 110, CRJ 117, CRJ 200, CRJ 208, CRJ 209, CRJ 210, CRJ 217, ECN 100, ECN 101, ECN 102, ECN 104, ECN 105, ECN 120, ECN150, ECN 250, GEO 110, GRT 110, HON 206, HSV 120, HSV 205, HSV 208, HSV 212, HSV 226, HSV 230, LAW 215, POL 101, POL 110, POL 120, POL 125, POL 126, POL 140, POL 150, POL 230, PSY 110, PSY 202, PSY 203, PSY 210, PSY 215, PSY 216, PSY 217, PSY 218, PSY 220, PSY 222, PSY 224, PSY 225, PSY 226, PSY 230, PSY 233, PSY 240, PSY 242, PSY 250, PSY 260, PSY 265, PSY 270, SOC 110, SOC 130, SOC 150, SOC 204, SOC 208, SOC 213, SOC 214, SOC 215, SOC 216, SOC 220, SOC 240, SOC250, SSN 120, SSN 230, WST 100, WST 215, WST 217
Explore the multidisciplinary world of robotics, and its relevance to current humanitarian, social, and environmental concerns. Modeling the fields of science and engineering, this class will be based on teamwork and cooperative problem solving in a supportive, hands on, laboratory environment. Solutions to a series of challenges will be designed, constructed, tested and revised by students working together in groups. A standard, modular, mobile robotics system will be used to design and construct robots capable of carrying out a single task or multiple tasks related to a variety of applications. The role of science, engineering and technology in modern society will also be explored. (Same as SEM 110.)Prerequisite: NoneAdditional Course Fee: $50.00 CEM fee (The fee is subject to change.)
Laboratory Science [E] ElectivesAST 110, AST 140, BIO 101, BIO 102, BIO 106, BIO 107, BIO 108, BIO 110, BIO 111, BIO 114, BIO 120, BIO 130, BIO 215, BIO 217, BIO 218, BIO 222, BIO 223, BIO 229, BIO 230, BIO 243, CHM 101, CHM 102, CHM 113, CHM 114, CHM 121, CHM 124, CHM 221, CHM 222, CHM 224, EGR 110, EGR 111, ESC 111, ESC 115, ESC 120, ESC 130, ENV 120, ENV 124, ENV 137, ENV 138, ENV 140, ENV 253, FRS 100, FRS 101, FRS 110, FRS 201, PHS 101, PHS 102, PHS 111, PHS 112, PHS 201, SEM 110, SEM 111, SEM 116, SEM 130, SUS 101, SUS 102, SUS 103, SUS 116, SUS 216

Program Requirements

30-32 CREDITS
Students will learn basic through advanced computer concepts with emphasis on both the personal computer and enterprise computing. Topics include hardware, application and system software, the Internet and World Wide Web, communications, e-commerce, societal issues, database management, systems analysis and design, programming, information systems, career opportunities, certifications in the computer field, and computer trends. (Students may not receive credit for both CSI 101 and CSI 111) Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101
Understand the fundamentals of computer nomenclature, particularly with respect to personal computer hardware and software and the World Wide Web; make use of the Web as a repository of the latest information and an integrated learning tool; develop an in-depth understanding of why computers are essential to the business world and society in general; focus on the computer as a valuable productivity tool, recognizing its position as the backbone of the computer industry and as a stand-alone and networked device; learn strategies for purchasing, installing, and maintaining a personal computer system; and learn to plan a career as a knowledge-worker in the information age. This course will enable students in any major to become computer literate. Students may not receive credit for both CSI 111 and BUS 115 or for both CSI 111 and CSI 101. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101
The course will prepare students for credentialing such as A+ Certification. This course will teach students how to troubleshoot, install programs, use various operating systems and their applications, as well as develop skills in formal problem solving. The student will also gain the benefit of hardware knowledge such as CPUs, memory, storage media, modems, network interface cards (NICs) and peripherals. The students will gain hands-on experience in building, upgrading and repairing computers. Prerequisite: CSI 111 or CSI 101
An introduction to the systems development life cycle, with emphasis on the analysis and design phases. Structured methodologies utilizing CASE tools, as well as prototyping techniques, are covered. A substantial analysis and design project will be required. This course will provide the student an opportunity to advance well beyond the fundamental computer knowledge developed in a beginning computer class and aid the student in future classes. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will have the ability to design complex computer systems. Prerequisite: 12 CSI credits
A continuation of CSI 211. Completes the process of preparing students for credentialing such as the A+ Certification Exam. Continues to teach students how to install programs, Network Interface Cards, and hubs. Topics will include disk files systems such as FAT, FAT 32, HPFS, and NTFS. Unix and Linux, as well as Macintosh OS systems, will be discussed. Additional topics to be covered include CR-ROM, CDRW, and external secondary storage devices. Prerequisite: CSI 101 or CSI 111
Basic models and capabilities of standard database management systems for microcomputers will be emphasized. Focus is on use of a relational database management system to solve real-world problems. Also covers the theories of database selection, design, management, and security; application generators; and data distribution. (Same as BUS 242.) Prerequisite: Introductory Computer Course (CSI 111, BUS 115, BUS 215, or equivalent)
A current topic is explored using information systems literature and resources. The focus of the course will change each semester. Student projects include current research, application details, formal presentations, and social implications. Prerequisite: 12 CSI credits
Provides students with an opportunity to build upon the foundations learned in CSI 120, Introduction to Business Data Communications. The student will develop the necessary skills to implement the basics of network building, work services, transmission media, and protocols. Through hands-on experience in setting up an actual computer network, the student will be able to demonstrate the how and why of networking technology, including the use of protocols. Prerequisite: CSI 101 or CSI 111
An introduction to the various technical and administrative aspects of Information Security and Assurance. This course provides the foundation for understanding the key issues associated with protecting information assets, determining the levels of protection and response to security incidents, and designing a consistent, reasonable information security system, with appropriate intrusion detection and reporting features. Prerequisite: CSI 101 or CSI 111 and eligibility for ENG 101

SEC 261 is no longer being offered, you may take the following to fulfil the requirement: BUS 220, CSI 252 or SSN 120.

Functions, limits, continuity, the derivative, applications, the integral, the fundamental theorem of calculus.NOTE: MTH 162 Applied Calculus is not a substitute for MTH 113 and cannot be used as a prerequisite for MTH 114.Prerequisite: MTH 108 or adequate score on the Mathematics Placement Exam
Graphical description of data, measures of central tendency and variability, probability and probability distributions, central limit theorem, estimation of parameters, testing hypotheses, regression and correlation, analysis of variance, and other topics in statistical inference. Prerequisite: MTH 085 or MTH 099 with a grade of C- or better; or SM12, or adequate score on the Mathematics Placement Examination.

10 CREDITS


Select two from the following, sufficient to complete the 60 credit graduation requirement.

ACC 111  |  Principles of Accounting I
Credits: 4
Prerequisite: Eligibility for MTH 085.

HUM XX3  |  Humanities Elective
Credits: 3

HUM XX3  |  Humanities Elective
Credits: 3

SOC XX1  | Social Science Elective*
Credits: 3

*Select from the following courses: ANT 101, ANT 103, ANT 110, ANT 114, ANT 120, ANT 130, ANT 150, ANT 250, CRJ 110, CRJ 117, CRJ 208, CRJ 209, CRJ 210, CRJ 217, ECN 100, ECN 101, ECN 102, ECN 120, ECN150, ECN 250, GEO 110, GRT 110, GRT 120, HON 206, HSV 205, HSV 208, HSV 210, HSV 212, HSV 226, LAW 215, POL 101, POL 110, POL 120, POL 125, POL 140, POL 150, POL 230, PSY 110, PSY 203, PSY 210, PSY 215, PSY 216, PSY 217, PSY 218, PSY 220, PSY 222, PSY 224, PSY 225, PSY 230, PSY 233, PSY 242, PSY 250, PSY 260, PSY 265, PSY 270, SOC 110, SOC 130, SOC 204, SOC 208, SOC 210, SOC 213, SOC 214, SOC 215, SOC 220, SOC 240, SOC250, SSN 120, SSN 230, WST 100, WST 215, WST 217.


SEC 261 is no longer being offered, you may take the following to fulfill the requirement:  BUS 220, CSI 252 or SSN 120.