Courses & Programs

Deaf Studies

This two-year program prepares students to work with the deaf and hard-of-hearing population in a variety of entry-level positions.

Claire Sanders

Chair, Deaf Studies

Arts and Humanities

Donahue 381 - 413.650.5368


What will you learn?

This two-year program prepares students to work with the deaf and hard-of-hearing population in a variety of entry-level positions. 

PROGRAM OUTCOMES

Upon completion of this degree, students will be able to:

  • Communicate with Deaf/hard-of-hearing people at an advanced level in American Sign Language.
  • Show respect for and an in-depth understanding towards the Deaf/hard-of-hearing population.
  • Obtain a rich knowledge of the culture, history and literature of Deaf people.
  • Possess a practicum experience at a setting involving the Deaf community.

What will you do?

Continue your education or enter the workforce! Students will use these ASL competencies and knowledge to help them further study at a four-year institution or pursue an entry-level career. Entry-level career opportunities include, but are not limited to:

  • Para-educators
  • Dormitory residential advisors,
  • Job coaches
  • Communication specialists.

Explore your options at HCC's Advising, Career and Transfer Center, or at The Best Schools.

60 total credits

26-27 credits General Education Requirements + 30 credits Program Requirements

No Online Options


General Education Requirements

26-27 CREDITS
This course is the first half of the college composition sequence and focuses on close reading, critical thinking, beginning research skills, and the writing process. Students will read, analyze, and cite a range of nonfiction texts. Students will produce several formal essays totaling approximately 3000 words. Prerequisite: Appropriate scores on English placement tests or C- or higher in ENG 095.
This course is the second half of the first-year composition sequence and focuses on close reading, critical thinking, academic writing, research, and the writing process. Students will locate and evaluate both primary and secondary sources, and will gain skill in summarizing and synthesizing source material while employing MLA documentation. Texts will include a range of nonfiction (articles, essays, scholarly sources) and literary works. Students will produce at least 3000 words of formal written work, including a documented essay of at least 1250 words. Prerequisite: ENG 101 with a grade of C-or higher.
Introduction to the study and principles of behavior. Topics include general principles of scientific investigation; physiological bases of behavior including sensation, perception, learning, emotion, and motivation; development; individual differences; attitudes; and group dynamics. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101.
A scientific examination of human social phenomena. Major topics include interaction, statuses and roles, groups, social institutions, culture, socialization, social control, conforming and deviant behavior, collective behavior, social inequality, demography, social change, urbanism, industrialism and globalization.Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101
Select from the following courses: ANT 101, ANT 103, ANT 110, ANT 114, ANT 120, ANT 130, ANT 150, ANT 250, COM 212, CRJ 110, CRJ 117, CRJ 200, CRJ 208, CRJ 209, CRJ 210, CRJ 217, ECN 100, ECN 101, ECN 102, ECN 104, ECN 105, ECN 120, ECN150, ECN 250, GEO 110, GRT 110, HON 206, HSV 120, HSV 205, HSV 208, HSV 212, HSV 226, HSV 230, LAW 215, POL 101, POL 110, POL 120, POL 125, POL 126, POL 140, POL 150, POL 230, PSY 110, PSY 202, PSY 203, PSY 210, PSY 215, PSY 216, PSY 217, PSY 218, PSY 220, PSY 222, PSY 224, PSY 225, PSY 226, PSY 230, PSY 233, PSY 240, PSY 242, PSY 250, PSY 260, PSY 265, PSY 270, SOC 110, SOC 130, SOC 150, SOC 204, SOC 208, SOC 213, SOC 214, SOC 215, SOC 216, SOC 220, SOC 240, SOC250, SSN 120, SSN 230, WST 100, WST 215, WST 217
Laboratory Science [E] ElectivesAST 110, AST 140, BIO 101, BIO 102, BIO 106, BIO 107, BIO 108, BIO 110, BIO 111, BIO 114, BIO 120, BIO 130, BIO 215, BIO 217, BIO 218, BIO 222, BIO 223, BIO 229, BIO 230, BIO 243, CHM 101, CHM 102, CHM 113, CHM 114, CHM 121, CHM 124, CHM 221, CHM 222, CHM 224, EGR 110, EGR 111, ESC 111, ESC 115, ESC 120, ESC 130, ENV 120, ENV 124, ENV 137, ENV 138, ENV 140, ENV 253, FRS 100, FRS 101, FRS 110, FRS 201, PHS 101, PHS 102, PHS 111, PHS 112, PHS 201, SEM 110, SEM 111, SEM 116, SEM 130, SUS 101, SUS 102, SUS 103, SUS 116, SUS 216
Laboratory Science [E] ElectivesAST 110, AST 140, BIO 101, BIO 102, BIO 106, BIO 107, BIO 108, BIO 110, BIO 111, BIO 114, BIO 120, BIO 130, BIO 215, BIO 217, BIO 218, BIO 222, BIO 223, BIO 229, BIO 230, BIO 243, CHM 101, CHM 102, CHM 113, CHM 114, CHM 121, CHM 124, CHM 221, CHM 222, CHM 224, EGR 110, EGR 111, ESC 110, ESC 111, ESC 115, ESC 120, ESC 130, ENV 120, ENV 124, ENV 137, ENV 138, ENV 140, ENV 253, FRS 100, FRS 101, FRS 110, FRS 201, PHS 101, PHS 102, PHS 111, PHS 112, PHS 201, SEM 110, SEM 111, SEM 116, SEM 130, SUS 101, SUS 102, SUS 103, SUS 116, SUS 216
Select from any Math (D) course with a MTH prefix.

Program Requirements

30 CREDITS
This course is an introduction to American Sign Language. Emphasis in this course is the development of receptive and expressive skills in ASL as well as the knowledge of the Deaf community. Awareness of basic cultural information for communication interaction is included. Basic conversational skills are emphasized.
This course is a continuation of ASL 101. It furthers the development of ASL receptive and expressive skills by introducing more complex lexical and grammatical structures, non-manual signals and advanced dialogues. Prerequisite: C or better in ASL 101 or appropriate score on ASL Competency Exam
This course builds upon ASL 102. It expands the use of ASL grammar, syntax, vocabulary and spatial references. Use of classifiers is heavily emphasized. Prerequisite: C or better in ASL 102 or appropriate score on ASL Competency Exam
This course is a continuation of ASL 201. Continued refinement of receptive and expressive skills will be emphasized. Skills in conversations and storytelling are stressed and are more complex. Prerequisite: C or better in ASL 201 or appropriate score on ASL Competency Exam
This course introduces a variety of topics relating to deaf people in America. Topics include, but are not limited to, communication modes used by deaf people, educational philosophies, technology used in the deaf community, various professions in which one can work with deaf people, Deaf culture, and different perspectives about deaf people. Through readings, lectures, guest speakers, and class discussions, these topics and more will be discussed and myths will be dispelled.
This course provides an in-depth study of American Deaf culture and the American Deaf community from the multidisciplinary perspective. Language, values, traditions, social interactions, and diversity of membership are discussed through readings, guest speakers, lectures and class discussion. Prerequisite: ENG 101
This course presents the history of deaf people starting with the ancient world and progressing to present day America. Topics include the history of oppression and accomplishments of deaf people, various historical views of deaf people, the treatment of deaf people, the influence of European philosophy on the American deaf community, the rise of schools for the deaf and modern Deaf empowerment movement. Prerequisite: ENG 101 (Same as HIS 108)
This course will prepare students for their practicum experience and help lay the foundation for future employment in the field. Through a combination of lecture, class discussion, guest speakers, and professional readings, students will become acquainted with various professions that work with the deaf/hard-of-hearing population. This will culminate with the students' final plan for their subsequent practicum. Prerequisite: ENG 101 and DFS 101, Pre/Co-requisite: ASL 201
This course explores the rich literary works of deaf people and their experience. Various literary genres, such as novels, films, poetry and humor, are discussed and analyzed through readings, videotapes and lectures. Prerequisite: ENG 102 and ASL 201
This course gives students the experience of working in the field with deaf/hard-of-hearing individuals in a supervised setting approved by the coordinator of Deaf Studies. Students will enhance their receptive and expressive skills in ASL as well as increase experience in the knowledge of Deaf culture. Students must complete 100 placement hours and attend a one-and-a-half-hour weekly seminar to discuss issues raised in the field. Placements include educational settings, independent living agencies and agencies that serve the deaf/hard-of-hearing population. CORI/SORI check may be required. Prerequisite: DFS 204 (Pre-Practicum In Deaf Studies), Pre/Co-requisite: ASL 202 and permission from the Deaf Studies Department Chair

3-4 CREDITS OF ELECTIVES


ANT 101  |  Cultural Anthropology [B]
Credits: 3  

POL 140  |  Civil Liberties [B]
Credits: 3  

PSY 216  |  Human Development [B]
Credits: 3
Prerequisite: PSY 110  

PSY 210  |  Social Psychology [B]
Credits: 3
Prerequisite: PSY 110  

PSY 220  |  Educational Psychology [B]
Credits: 3
Prerequisite: PSY 110  

SOC 214  |  Social Problems [B]
Credits: 3
Prerequisite: SOC 110  

SSN 120  |  Conflict Resolution and Mediation [B]
Credits: 3  

ANT 103  |  People and Their Languages [B]

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101


CREDITS: 0-1

Choose any one general elective class sufficient to complete 60 credit graduation requirement.