Courses & Programs

General Integrated Studies - Elementary Education

This program is designed for students interested in teaching elementary school, Grades 1 through 6.

What will you learn?

These students will transfer to Westfield State University or to other state or private colleges after receiving their Associate Degree. Graduates of HCC Education programs are expected to demonstrate developing skills toward all required teacher competencies.

60 total credits

35 credits General Education Requirements + 25 credits General Education Requirements


General Education Requirements

35 CREDITS
This course is the first half of the college composition sequence and focuses on close reading, critical thinking, beginning research skills, and the writing process. Students will read, analyze, and cite a range of nonfiction texts. Students will produce several formal essays totaling approximately 3000 words. Prerequisite: Appropriate scores on English placement tests or C- or higher in ENG 095.
This course is the second half of the first-year composition sequence and focuses on close reading, critical thinking, academic writing, research, and the writing process. Students will locate and evaluate both primary and secondary sources, and will gain skill in summarizing and synthesizing source material while employing MLA documentation. Texts will include a range of nonfiction (articles, essays, scholarly sources) and literary works. Students will produce at least 3000 words of formal written work, including a documented essay of at least 1250 words. Prerequisite: ENG 101 with a grade of C-or higher.
Introduction to the study and principles of behavior. Topics include general principles of scientific investigation; physiological bases of behavior including sensation, perception, learning, emotion, and motivation; development; individual differences; attitudes; and group dynamics. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101.
A scientific examination of human social phenomena. Major topics include interaction, statuses and roles, groups, social institutions, culture, socialization, social control, conforming and deviant behavior, collective behavior, social inequality, demography, social change, urbanism, industrialism and globalization.Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101
Major geographic concepts and contemporary world regional geography. Examines the field of geography, basic globe and map concepts, the physical world (oceans and continents), and the political world (states and other political units). Includes an in-depth inspection of each of the world's developed and developing realms.
A survey of the history of the civilizations of Asia, Africa, Europe, and the Americas from their beginnings to the sixteenth century. Emphasis is placed on the economic, social, political, religious, and cultural developments that have shaped the modern world.
A survey of the political, economic, social, and cultural developments of the United States from pre-Colonial times to the end of the Civil War, including early settlement, the Revolution, the implementation of the Constitution, the War of 1812, the Jacksonian era, and the causes and course of the Civil War.
A survey of the political, economic, social, and cultural developments of the United States from the end of the Civil War until the present, including such topics as Reconstruction, industrialization, immigration, the Great Depression, the New Deal, the world wars, and the Cold War.
This course may focus chronologically on such American writers as Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, Whitman, and Dickinson; or, it may be organized thematically on topics such as Puritan religious tradition (Bradford, Edwards, Hawthorne, Dickinson); attitudes toward the natural world (Cooper, Thoreau, Emerson); dissonant voices (Stowe, Thoreau, Twain, Whitman, Jacobs); or liberation and limitation (Jefferson, Douglas, Jacobs, Melville). Prerequisite: ENG 102
This course may focus chronologically on such American writers as Eliot, Frost, Hemingway, Faulkner, and O'Neill; or, it may be organized thematically on topics such as the city in literature (Yezierska, Wharton, Dreiser, Crane, James); pioneers and immigrants (Cather, Rolvaag, Curran, Mangione); small town (Anderson, Robinson, Lewis, Cheever, Carver); dissonant voices (Baldwin, Kerouac, Cummings, Miller, Eliot); or Southern voices (Faulkner, Glasgow, O'Connor, Williams, Mason, Gaines). Prerequisite: ENG 102
An introduction to life's basic processes including the chemistry of life, the structure and function of the cell, how cells use energy and matter, how cells reproduce, and how genetic inheritance occurs. Examples of how these processes affect each and everyone of us on a daily basis will be explored. This course will also explore the methods of science through in class assignments and laboratory work so that students will better understand the processes of collecting, analyzing and interpreting data in various formats. Laboratories supplement lecture by allowing students to explore topics in a hands-on fashion. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101

Select one laboratory Science from the following: AST 110, CHM 121, ENV 120, ESC 110, ESC 120, PHS 101.

This course is designed for Elementary Education and Early Childhood majors. This is an introductory course on number systems. Topics include the development and properties of various number systems as well as operations and different representations within these number systems. Systems explored will include integers, rational numbers, real and complex numbers along with bases other than 10. Verbal explanations and multiple representations will be stressed.Prerequisite: MTH 075 or MTH 079 with a grade of C- or better or SM06, or equivalent score on the Mathematics Placement Examination

General Education Requirements

25 CREDITS
This course is designed to stimulate intelligent, critical, and reflective analysis about the nature and value of education in society. The course explores the historical, philosophical, social, and political issues, as well as current standards, requirements, and trends in early childhood through secondary education. Emphasis is placed on the role of schools in maintaining, perpetuating, and influencing culture, both nationally and internationally, and on discovery of personal values, attitudes, and attributes about the role of learners, teachers, schools, and educational systems in a democratic society. A ten-hour field study in and educational setting is required.
Examines physical, cognitive, social and emotional growth and development of children from conception to twelve years of age. Provides insight into theories and practices which influence the behavior of children in their environments. Students conduct child observations in a preschool/kindergarten classroom setting. 3 hours of field experience is required as part of this course.Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101
This course is designed as an introduction to strategies in guiding children's behavior in the classroom. The focus of the class will be on the prevention of behavior problems through appropriate teaching practices, classroom design, class expectations and social interactions.Prerequisite: EDU 104 with a grade of C or better and Eligibility for ENG 101
This course provides a survey of the unique needs of children with disabilities and at-risk students within the educational context. An emphasis will be placed on understanding the origin and characteristics of specific disabilities, and development of collaborative intervention strategies that meet the needs of all children. A 20-hour service learning unit in an inclusive educational setting is required.Prerequisite: EDU 104 with a grade of C or better and eligibility for ENG 101
Students will be introduced to teaching skills and strategies for elementary classrooms (grades 1-6). Students will create developmentally appropriate lesson plans in alignment with the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks and Common Core State Standards. The course will prepare students to teach and integrate all subjects required at an elementary level with writing across the curriculum, including: Social Studies, Math, Science, English/Language Arts, the Arts, and Physical Education. These concepts will be applied in a laboratory based experience that will include written lesson plans, student-made materials and participatory workshops. FE: A 20-hour total of observation and pre-practicum experience in an elementary classroom is required, which includes the delivery of at least three lessons.Prerequisites: EDU 100, EDU 104, and EDU 208, each with a grade of C or better and ENG 101 (Min. 45 credits completed).
English 224 provides an introduction to the vast field of children's literature, offering an overview of historical changes in this literature; major genres, including picture books, fairy tales, novels, poetry, and creative non-fiction; and tools for analysis, such as psychological development, educational philosophy, or literary theory. Students will read texts geared for a range of ages, including several texts aimed at young readers ages 0-8, several texts for readers ages 7-12, and at least one or two texts meant for the young adult market. Students can expect to learn techniques of visual analysis for picture books and graphic novels, and should also expect to trace common themes and pre-occupations found in children's literature, such as the home-away-home story pattern, or the construction of alternative families. While the course might primarily focus on children's literature within the Western tradition, students have the opportunity to explore children's texts in translation from other traditions, such as China or India. Regardless, students can expect to explore the enormous cultural and stylistic diversity of Western children's literature, and to expand their ideas of what children might read, from dark realism to whimsical fantasy to subversive humor. Prerequisite: ENG 102
A foundations course in art and design. The basic elements and principles of two-dimensional composition will be explored through the manipulation and organization of black, white, and gray media. Students will learn to think and communicate visually. Two 2 1/2 studios per week
A chronological, historical analysis of major works of art from prehistoric times to the present. Emphasis on technical, aesthetic, and historical relevance. Prerequisite: ENG 101, previously or concurrently
A chronological, historical analysis of major works of art from prehistoric times to the present. Emphasis on technical, aesthetic, and historical relevance. Prerequisite: ENG 101, previously or concurrently
This introductory course is designed to enhance the enjoyment and understanding of a theatrical experience. Students will explore the nature of theater as a unique artistic form of expression and recognize the creative power of theater in a society. The class will examine a variety of historical and cultural perspectives through reading and discussing different plays from various time periods, and gain insight into the role of the playwright, the actor, the director, the designer, and the audience while investigating the major elements of dramatic performance. Students will study fundamental principles and theories of drama from: Greek, Renaissance, Modern and Contemporary theater and develop criteria for critically evaluating and responding to a theatrical experience. The course content will include: play-reading and analysis, active exploration of course material, lecture and discussion. Students in this course will be required to attend a live theatrical performance.
Open to all students who want to learn to read music and learn introductory music theory. Covers reading and writing pitches and rhythmic patterns, major and minor scales and key signatures, intervals, and chords. Also provides a basic introduction to the keyboard. No previous experience is necessary.
An introductory appreciation course, open to all students. Explores music outside the Western European tradition, including music of Polynesia, Native North America, Latin America, Africa and Black America, Eastern Europe, the Mideast, Indonesia, India, and Japan. Specific topics chosen from these areas will be studied.
An introductory appreciation course, open to all students. Explores the nature and meaning of artistic creativity and aesthetic judgment in the music of Western European tradition.
Open to all students. Traces the history of jazz from its African roots to the present, covering its development through specific historical eras, including the African retentions in American jazz, work songs, spirituals, blues, early syncopated music, ragtime, the music of New Orleans, swing, big band, small combos, bebop (modern jazz), avant garde, and contemporary.
This introductory course is designed to enhance the enjoyment and understanding of a theatrical experience. Students will explore the nature of theater as a unique artistic form of expression and recognize the creative power of theater in a society. The class will examine a variety of historical and cultural perspectives through reading and discussing different plays from various time periods, and gain insight into the role of the playwright, the actor, the director, the designer, and the audience while investigating the major elements of dramatic performance. Students will study fundamental principles and theories of drama from: Greek, Renaissance, Modern and Contemporary theater and develop criteria for critically evaluating and responding to a theatrical experience. The course content will include: play-reading and analysis, active exploration of course material, lecture and discussion. Students in this course will be required to attend a live theatrical performance.


Students must achieve a minimum grade of "C" in all EDU prefix courses in order to graduate from these programs and options.

Overall minimum GPA 2.7 for both ENG course requirements for WSU

Select one laboratory Science from the following: AST 110,  CHM 121, ESC 110,  ESC 120, ENV 120,  PHS 101; Recommended: ESC 110, 120 or ENV 120.

Criminal Offense Record Act (CORI), and Sex Offender Registry Information (SORI)

Students enrolled in EDU 100, EDU 104, EDU 208, and EDU 260 and EDU 268 will be subject to a CORI/SORI check and review pursuant to the Criminal Record Information Act, Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 6, Section172-178, and Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 18a, Section 1, et seq., and regulations promulgated pursuant to such statutes. Applicants with a court record/past conviction may be unable to participate in the Education Program. The College policy can be found in the Student Handbook.This program qualifies for MassTransfer, which guarantees credit transfer to Massachusetts state colleges and universities. MassTransfer also will grant students automatic acceptance to certain state colleges and universities by achieving the minimum grade point average and the HCC degree.