Courses & Programs

Food Service Management

Warren Leigh

Chair, Hospitality Mgt and Culinary Arts

Business and Technology

Frost 168

413.552.2298 (Tel)


What will you learn?

The Foodservice Management Program prepare students for culinary arts and entry-level management positions in the diverse field of foodservice including restaurants, clubs, institutions and other managed services. Students will gain first-hand industry experience, an understanding of professional development in the industry, and the ability to undertake a teamwork-based business approach to identify, define, respond to and evaluate problems and resolutions in various foodservice industry situations. 

PROGRAM OUTCOMES

Upon graduating from this program, students will be able to:

  • Use a hands-on approach to identify, define and appropriately handle a vase variety of food product and equipment used in the commercial kitchen, dining room and bakeshop
  • Understand current industry standards as well as legal and ethical issues involved in the safe handling and service of food and beverages
  • Use generic business skills as well as functionally-based hospitality industry skills to define relationships between situations and understand professional terminology and concepts within the industry
  • Use mathematics and a business-oriented approach to identify, define, respond to and evaluate problems in reaching resolutions to global hospitality industry problems
  • Understand the current ethical, social, and nutritional issues in the hospitality industry
  • Communicate effectively with colleagues and customers using a variety of information resources
  • Work effectively in an organization and as a member of a team

What will you do?

Transfer to a four-year college or university, or enter the workforce! Job and career options include:

  • Food & Beverage Management
  • Banquet & Catering Management
  • Corporate & Event Planning
  • Food Service Production

Explore your options at HCC's Advising, Career & Transfer Center, or at What Can I Do With This Major?

67 total credits

20 credits General Education Requirements + 47 credits Program Requirements

Depending on course selection, 50% of this program can be completed online.


General Education Requirements

20 CREDITS
This course is the first half of the college composition sequence and focuses on close reading, critical thinking, beginning research skills, and the writing process. Students will read, analyze, and cite a range of nonfiction texts. Students will produce several formal essays totaling approximately 3000 words. Prerequisite: Appropriate scores on English placement tests or C- or higher in ENG 095.
This course is the second half of the first-year composition sequence and focuses on close reading, critical thinking, academic writing, research, and the writing process. Students will locate and evaluate both primary and secondary sources, and will gain skill in summarizing and synthesizing source material while employing MLA documentation. Texts will include a range of nonfiction (articles, essays, scholarly sources) and literary works. Students will produce at least 3000 words of formal written work, including a documented essay of at least 1250 words. Prerequisite: ENG 101 with a grade of C-or higher.
Introduction to the study and principles of behavior. Topics include general principles of scientific investigation; physiological bases of behavior including sensation, perception, learning, emotion, and motivation; development; individual differences; attitudes; and group dynamics. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101.
A scientific examination of human social phenomena. Major topics include interaction, statuses and roles, groups, social institutions, culture, socialization, social control, conforming and deviant behavior, collective behavior, social inequality, demography, social change, urbanism, industrialism and globalization.Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101
Select from the following courses: ANT 101, ANT 103, ANT 110, ANT 114, ANT 120, ANT 130, ANT 150, ANT 250, COM 212, CRJ 110, CRJ 117, CRJ 200, CRJ 208, CRJ 209, CRJ 210, CRJ 217, ECN 100, ECN 101, ECN 102, ECN 104, ECN 105, ECN 120, ECN150, ECN 250, GEO 110, GRT 110, HON 206, HSV 120, HSV 205, HSV 208, HSV 212, HSV 226, HSV 230, LAW 215, POL 101, POL 110, POL 120, POL 125, POL 126, POL 140, POL 150, POL 230, PSY 110, PSY 202, PSY 203, PSY 210, PSY 215, PSY 216, PSY 217, PSY 218, PSY 220, PSY 222, PSY 224, PSY 225, PSY 226, PSY 230, PSY 233, PSY 240, PSY 242, PSY 250, PSY 260, PSY 265, PSY 270, SOC 110, SOC 130, SOC 150, SOC 204, SOC 208, SOC 213, SOC 214, SOC 215, SOC 216, SOC 220, SOC 240, SOC250, SSN 120, SSN 230, WST 100, WST 215, WST 217
Laboratory Science [E] ElectivesAST 110, AST 140, BIO 101, BIO 102, BIO 106, BIO 107, BIO 108, BIO 110, BIO 111, BIO 114, BIO 120, BIO 130, BIO 215, BIO 217, BIO 218, BIO 222, BIO 223, BIO 229, BIO 230, BIO 243, CHM 101, CHM 102, CHM 113, CHM 114, CHM 121, CHM 124, CHM 221, CHM 222, CHM 224, EGR 110, EGR 111, ESC 111, ESC 115, ESC 120, ESC 130, ENV 120, ENV 124, ENV 137, ENV 138, ENV 140, ENV 253, FRS 100, FRS 101, FRS 110, FRS 201, PHS 101, PHS 102, PHS 111, PHS 112, PHS 201, SEM 110, SEM 111, SEM 116, SEM 130, SUS 101, SUS 102, SUS 103, SUS 116, SUS 216
Laboratory Science [E] ElectivesAST 110, AST 140, BIO 101, BIO 102, BIO 106, BIO 107, BIO 108, BIO 110, BIO 111, BIO 114, BIO 120, BIO 130, BIO 215, BIO 217, BIO 218, BIO 222, BIO 223, BIO 229, BIO 230, BIO 243, CHM 101, CHM 102, CHM 113, CHM 114, CHM 121, CHM 124, CHM 221, CHM 222, CHM 224, EGR 110, EGR 111, ESC 110, ESC 111, ESC 115, ESC 120, ESC 130, ENV 120, ENV 124, ENV 137, ENV 138, ENV 140, ENV 253, FRS 100, FRS 101, FRS 110, FRS 201, PHS 101, PHS 102, PHS 111, PHS 112, PHS 201, SEM 110, SEM 111, SEM 116, SEM 130, SUS 101, SUS 102, SUS 103, SUS 116, SUS 216

Program Requirements

47 CREDITS
This course explores the basic statements of an accounting system: the Balance Sheet, the Income Statement, and the Statement of Retained Earnings. Students will examine the accounting cycle with an emphasis on the methods of accumulating and summarizing data generated by business transactions. Students will apply their manual accounting skills to an automated accounting system using a learning management system. Areas of concentration will include adjusting entries, closing process, inventory anaylsis, merchandising transactions, cash control procedures, and receivables. Prerequisite: Eligibility for MTH 085
An introductory, hands-on course designed to provide an overview of microcomputer hardware and software currently available and to provide hands-on exposure to internet, e-mail, operating system, word processing spreadsheets, database and graphics applications. Students will not receive credit for CSI 111 and BUS 115. Keyboarding skills preferred, but not required.
An intensive course designed to prepare students for professional studies in the culinary arts. Focus will be on understanding characteristics of the ingredients used in food preparation as well as developing an appreciation of food as a sensory, cultural, and esthetic experience. Prerequisite: Eligibility for MTH 085 and ENG 095 Prerequisite or Corequisite: CUL 115 Additional Course Fee: $425.00 Uniforms and Tools (The fee is subject to change.)
An intensive course designed to prepare students for professional studies in the culinary arts. Focus will be on developing proficiency in a number of basic food preparation techniques, then using that proficiency to prepare and present food items in a variety of settings. Students will be introduced to the various career opportunities that exist in the culinary arts. Prerequisite: A grade of C- or better in CUL 100
Focus is on the mechanics of pursuing a career in the foodservice industry. Students will explore multiple career paths within the foodservice industry and learn how to manage and advance their careers successfully.
An introduction to culinary and dining service skills as practiced in function settings. Students will participate in an ongoing series of special banquet and reception projects during which they will be coached through the food preparation and service required. 1 class hour per week and 35 clock hours in special events as assigned throughout the semester. Prerequisite or Corequisite: CUL 100
The fundamental principles and procedures for preparing baked goods, pastries, and desserts. Proper mixing and baking techniques, weights and measures, recipe conversion, terminology, function of ingredients, and baking science. Preparation and analysis of cookies, cakes, butter creams, icings, quick breads, yeast breads, and pastries. Appropriate for in-service professionals as well as cooks and students who desire further training in baking techniques. Lecture, demonstration, and laboratory methods insure that a firm base in both theory and practice of the baking arts is acquired.Prerequisite: Eligibility for both MTH 085 and ENG 095
A study of sanitation and safety problems encountered in the food service industry, with an emphasis on proper food handling techniques. A nationally recognized foodservice safety and sanitation exam-NRAEF is taken as part of the course.
This course is designed to teach culinary arts students to apply basic mathematics to specific applications in the foodservice industry. A brief review of basic math will be followed up by an introduction to US units of measure and metric conversions. Further subject matter will include weight/volume conversions, yield percentages, edible portion costs, recipe costing, and beverage calculations. Rules of thumb and common industry usages of the aforementioned skills will be explored. Prerequisite: Eligibility for MTH 085
An introductory course in human nutrition for the culinary arts student, foodservice management student, and foodservice professional. The course content focuses on the science of human nutrition as it relates to personal health, food preparation, menu planning, recipe modification, and the marketing of nutritious menu items within a commercial or institutional foodservice setting.2.5 Class Hours and 1.25 Lab HoursPrerequisites: Eligibility for ENG 101 and 24 credits in CUL designated courses to include CUL 101 with a C- or better
An introduction to the science of nutrition as it applies to everyday life. Students will learn how to apply the logic of science to their own nutritional concerns. Topics include the six major nutrients: carbohydrates, fats, proteins, vitamins, minerals, and water. The course also will examine energy balance, weight control, the digestive process, nutrition fads, supplements, fiber, and disease as it relates to nutrition and fitness. A dietary computer application is used throughout the semester to track personal dietary, energy, and fitness. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101.
Focus is on the role of personal development and professional behaviors in the foodservice industry. Students will be encouraged to seek appropriate employment or volunteer opportunities tailored to their individual interests and will acquire the tools necessary to achieving that goal. The course will emphasize such topics as locating potential employers, writing resumes and cover letters, conducting successful interviews and creating a working job search portfolio. Prerequisite: A grade of C- or better in CUL 104
Builds on fundamental cooking and service techniques within a restaurant venue. Students are guided through planning, producing, and serving menu items in an a la carte setting. Emphasis is placed on traditional American and International dishes. Speed and accuracy of production, plate presentation, communication, and efficient service are main elements of study. Students will participate in a capstone group project in which they design and execute an a la carte menu. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in CUL 101 and passing score on NRAEF ServSafe Certification Exam.
An intensive study of both the technical and managerial skills used in banquet food production and service, with special emphasis on the planning and execution of a variety of special events. Topics covered include buffets, cocktail receptions, formal dinners, off-premises catering, and the control and service of wines and alcoholic beverages. One lecture hour per week and 70 clock hours in special events as assigned throughout the semester. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in CUL 101 and CUL 105, or HCA 130; and a passing score on the NRAEF ServSafe Certification Exam.
An introduction to the operation of hotels, motels, restaurants, resorts, and tourism. Emphasis on the development of the industry, current trends, and management responsibilities.
An opportunity to apply classroom theory in an actual work setting in a supervised position. Approximately 150 hours of work plus a 50-minute weekly seminar that includes presentation and discussion of topics related to success on the job as well as career exploration. Prerequisites: 24 credits, completion of HCA 101, and completion of either HCA 232 OR CUL 215.
Each of the managerial functions--planning, organizing, directing, and controlling--is discussed from the standpoint of how all four interrelate to become the management process. Managerial skills necessary to accomplish these functions are also described, including human relations, decision making, and communication.


Students must pass the NRAEF ServSafe exam in order to complete the requirements for attaining the certificate.  CUL 111 may be waived in lieu of an earned and valid ServSafe Certificate.

Students who intend to transfer should look at the following option: B051 Hospitality Management Transfer.  The hospitality transfer option is a MassTransfer degree intended for UMass (2.7 GPA required) and other state schools, and is also the best option for transferability to other four-year programs.