Courses & Programs

Human Resource Management

Kristine Ricker Choleva

Chair, Business

Business and Technology

Kittredge Center 513

413.552.2565 (Tel)


What will you learn?

This two-year associate degree option prepares students for careers in human resource management. Students will learn human resource inventory management, recruiting and retention and organizational behavior.

PROGRAM OUTCOMES

Upon graduating from this program, students will be able to:

  • Interpret accounting data and analyze financial statements
  • Apply the marketing conceptappreciate the role of law in business
  • Define traditional functions of management and its contribution to strategic planning. 

What will you do?

Transfer to a four-year college or university, or go right into the workforce! Job and career options include:

  • Recruitment
  • Employee Relations
  • Organizational Management
  • Policy Development

Explore your options at HCC's Advising, Career & Transfer Center, or at What Can I Do with This Major?

61 total credits

26 credits General Education Requirements + 29 credits Program Requirements

Depending on the course selection, up to 100% of this program can be completed online.


General Education Requirements

26 CREDITS
This course is the first half of the college composition sequence and focuses on close reading, critical thinking, beginning research skills, and the writing process. Students will read, analyze, and cite a range of nonfiction texts. Students will produce several formal essays totaling approximately 3000 words. Prerequisite: Appropriate scores on English placement tests or C- or higher in ENG 095.
This course is the second half of the first-year composition sequence and focuses on close reading, critical thinking, academic writing, research, and the writing process. Students will locate and evaluate both primary and secondary sources, and will gain skill in summarizing and synthesizing source material while employing MLA documentation. Texts will include a range of nonfiction (articles, essays, scholarly sources) and literary works. Students will produce at least 3000 words of formal written work, including a documented essay of at least 1250 words. Prerequisite: ENG 101 with a grade of C-or higher.
An introduction to the basic principles and processes of macroeconomics, including theories of the determinants of output, unemployment and inflation: the composition and role of fiscal and monetary policy, and international trade and finance. Theories are used to develop and understanding and analysis of current economic issues and policies. Prerequisite: ECN 100 with a grade of C- or better or Eligibility for MTH 095
An introduction to basic principles, processes, and applications of microeconomics: how a market-based capitalist system determines what products are produced, how they are produced, and the way in which the benefits are distributed. Topics include supply and demand analysis for products and for factors of production; production functions and costs; production and pricing of output within different industry structures; efficiency, equity, international trade, externalities and public goods. Prerequisites: ECN 100 with a grade of C- or better or Eligibility for MTH 095
Introduction to the study and principles of behavior. Topics include general principles of scientific investigation; physiological bases of behavior including sensation, perception, learning, emotion, and motivation; development; individual differences; attitudes; and group dynamics. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101.
An introduction to the study, principles and findings of Social Psychology. Topics include methods of research; social perception (self-perception, perception of others and perceiving groups); social influence (attitudes and conformity); social relations (attractions, altruism and aggression) and applying social psychology (law, business and health). Prerequisite: PSY 110
Laboratory Science [E] ElectivesAST 110, AST 140, BIO 101, BIO 102, BIO 106, BIO 107, BIO 108, BIO 110, BIO 111, BIO 114, BIO 120, BIO 130, BIO 215, BIO 217, BIO 218, BIO 222, BIO 223, BIO 229, BIO 230, BIO 243, CHM 101, CHM 102, CHM 113, CHM 114, CHM 121, CHM 124, CHM 221, CHM 222, CHM 224, EGR 110, EGR 111, ESC 111, ESC 115, ESC 120, ESC 130, ENV 120, ENV 124, ENV 137, ENV 138, ENV 140, ENV 253, FRS 100, FRS 101, FRS 110, FRS 201, PHS 101, PHS 102, PHS 111, PHS 112, PHS 201, SEM 110, SEM 111, SEM 116, SEM 130, SUS 101, SUS 102, SUS 103, SUS 116, SUS 216
Laboratory Science [E] ElectivesAST 110, AST 140, BIO 101, BIO 102, BIO 106, BIO 107, BIO 108, BIO 110, BIO 111, BIO 114, BIO 120, BIO 130, BIO 215, BIO 217, BIO 218, BIO 222, BIO 223, BIO 229, BIO 230, BIO 243, CHM 101, CHM 102, CHM 113, CHM 114, CHM 121, CHM 124, CHM 221, CHM 222, CHM 224, EGR 110, EGR 111, ESC 110, ESC 111, ESC 115, ESC 120, ESC 130, ENV 120, ENV 124, ENV 137, ENV 138, ENV 140, ENV 253, FRS 100, FRS 101, FRS 110, FRS 201, PHS 101, PHS 102, PHS 111, PHS 112, PHS 201, SEM 110, SEM 111, SEM 116, SEM 130, SUS 101, SUS 102, SUS 103, SUS 116, SUS 216
A focus on organizing, interpreting, assessing and communication mathematical data for quantitative decision making in the business environment. The problem solving, reasoning, and communication requirements in this course will help students make better decisions associated with common business functions such as: payroll and taxes; accounting; banking; both electronic and store-front retailing; insurance, and finance. The course will stress critical and logical thinking skills, number sense and estimation, evaluating and producing statistical information, basic financial decision making, some fundamentals of probability, and an overview of the important social implications underlying any numerical data. Prerequisite: BUS 115 or BUS 215 or CSI 111 and eligibility for MTH 095
Graphical description of data, measures of central tendency and variability, probability and probability distributions, central limit theorem, estimation of parameters, testing hypotheses, regression and correlation, analysis of variance, and other topics in statistical inference. Prerequisite: MTH 085 or MTH 099 with a grade of C- or better; or SM12, or adequate score on the Mathematics Placement Examination.

Program Requirements

29 CREDITS

This course explores the basic statements of an accounting system: the Balance Sheet, the Income Statement, and the Statement of Retained Earnings. Students will examine the accounting cycle with an emphasis on the methods of accumulating and summarizing data generated by business transactions. Students will apply their manual accounting skills to an automated accounting system using a learning management system. Areas of concentration will include adjusting entries, closing process, inventory analysis, merchandising transactions, cash control procedures, and receivables. Prerequisite: Eligibility for MTH 085

This course will expand upon the basic concepts and theories that students learned in the Principles of Accounting I course. Areas studied include, but not limited to, the following: long-term assets, short-term and long-term liabilities; transactions unique to corporations issuing stock; Statement of Stockholders' Equity; Statement of Cash Flows, Financial Statement Analysis, as well as gaining exposure to accounting for Manufacturers through an introduction to Managerial Accounting and Job Order Costing. Prerequisite: ACC 111 with a grade of C- or better.
A study of the interpersonal and communication skills fundamental for success in the workplace. Students will hone their professional style as they study topics including professional behavior, interpersonal interactions, and civility as they relate to the workplace.
This course introduces students to the relationship between business and society. Topics include corporate citizenship, identification and analysis of stakeholder issues, business ethics fundamentals, business influence on government and the public sector, ethical issues in the global arena, workplace issues, and employment discrimination and affirmative action. Upon completion students should be able to apply ethical principles and guidelines to business decision making.
The focus of this course is to develop financially literate students. It will provide a practical introduction to personal finance and money management by focusing on realistic ways to effectively manage and protect personal assets and maximize financial health and stability. Students will learn how to design a personal budget and learn to make appropriate decisions with regard to savings, investments, insurance, credit protection, estate planning and managing personal assets. Students will evaluate the cost of borrowed money, real estate investments, the effective use of credit, tax implications and the effects the economy has on personal financial decisions. Prerequisite: Eligibility for MTH 085
An introductory, hands-on course designed to provide an overview of microcomputer hardware and software currently available and to provide hands-on exposure to internet, e-mail, operating system, word processing spreadsheets, database and graphics applications. Students will not receive credit for CSI 111 and BUS 115. Keyboarding skills preferred, but not required.
A study of the sources of law, the Massachusetts and Federal Court systems, steps in civil litigation, and the general principles of contract law.
A study of employment law for the non-legal professional in Human Resource Management, emphasizing federal and state laws governing the employment process and the relationship between employers and employees.
Each of the managerial functions--planning, organizing, directing, and controlling--is discussed from the standpoint of how all four interrelate to become the management process. Managerial skills necessary to accomplish these functions are also described, including human relations, decision making, and communication.
Survey of the principles, problems, and practices of modern business in the management of the work force, from recruitment through retirement. Emphasis is on the use of appropriate practices in firms of various types and sizes.
A study of the basic marketing principles, functions and institutions. This course will walk students through the process by which organizations analyze, plan, implement, and control programs to develop and maintain beneficial exchanges with target buyers. Students will develop an understanding of how effective marketing is critical for the long-term success of any business organization; and how the marketing function ensures that the firm attracts, retains, and grows customers by creating, delivering, and communicating superior customer value.

ELECTIVES

6 CREDITS

Select from the following; ACC, BUS, HCA, LAW, MKT, MGT, OR SPO.


Students who intend to transfer to a baccalaureate program should look at the following options: B023 Business Administration MassTransfer to state universities including UMass and Westfield State University; B034 Business Administration General Transfer to most four-year private colleges; B045 Paralegal Option for transfer to Elms College and Bay Path University; B056 Hospitality Management Transfer to state universities including UMass and to Johnson & Wales University; or B096 Sport Management transfer to state and private universities.

Math Elective: Select from MTH 160(D), MTH 162(D), MTH 113(D), MTH 114(D), or MTH 142(D). Students will not receive credit for both MTH 162 and MTH 113.

Business Electives: Select from following; ACC, BUS, HCA, LAW, MKT, MGT, OR SPO.