Courses & Programs

Nutrition & Food Transfer

The Nutrition Program at HCC is a transfer program for articulation with the University of Massachusetts Amherst.

Laura Christoph

Faculty, Health Fitness and Nutrition

Health Sciences

Bartley Center 204

413.552.2300 (Tel)


What will I learn?

The Nutrition Program at HCC is a transfer program for articulation with the University of Massachusetts at Amherst or other four-year institutions with nutrition and food science programs.

PROGRAM OUTCOMES

Upon completion of this program the student will be able to:

  • Discuss nutrition as it relates to health and well-being.
  • Discuss the factors that influence behaviors and attitudes about food.
  • Discuss the macro and micro nutrients and identify current recommendations for and sources of each.
  • Identify nutritional needs through the lifecycle.
  • Discuss food digestion and metabolism.
  • Discuss dietary practices of different cultures.
  • Discuss dietary supplementation risks and benefits.
  • Discuss food safety and security.
  • Demonstrate effective interpersonal skills required by nutrition advisors.
  • Explain the relationship between nutrition, physical activity,and fitness Provide recommendations for physical activity.
  • Transfer to a 4 year institution to pursue a Bachelor's of Science in Nutrition and qualify for participation in a one-year ADA internship and become licensed to work in all fields of Nutrition in the United States.

What will I do?

This program is for students who wish to transfer to a four-year college or university to prepare for a variety of careers, including:

  • Community & Public Health Nutrition
  • Health Sciences
  • Food Science
  • Research

Learn more at What Can I Do With This Major?

61 total credits

35 credits General Education Requirements + 26 credits Program Requirements

Depending on the course selection 50% of this program can be completed online.


General Education Requirements

35 CREDITS
This course is the first half of the college composition sequence and focuses on close reading, critical thinking, beginning research skills, and the writing process. Students will read, analyze, and cite a range of nonfiction texts. Students will produce several formal essays totaling approximately 3000 words. Prerequisite: Appropriate scores on English placement tests or C- or higher in ENG 095.
This course is the second half of the first-year composition sequence and focuses on close reading, critical thinking, academic writing, research, and the writing process. Students will locate and evaluate both primary and secondary sources, and will gain skill in summarizing and synthesizing source material while employing MLA documentation. Texts will include a range of nonfiction (articles, essays, scholarly sources) and literary works. Students will produce at least 3000 words of formal written work, including a documented essay of at least 1250 words. Prerequisite: ENG 101 with a grade of C-or higher.
An introduction to the field, emphasizing the similarities and differences among societies with different economic, social, political, and religious traditions. Several societies with cultures quite different from our own are studied in detail. Theories about social structure and culture, the research methods used by anthropologists, and the ethics of anthropological research and applied anthropology are covered.
Introduction to the study and principles of behavior. Topics include general principles of scientific investigation; physiological bases of behavior including sensation, perception, learning, emotion, and motivation; development; individual differences; attitudes; and group dynamics. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101.
Humanities [C] Electives ART 101, ART 110, ART 121, ART 122, ART 123, ART 124, ART 131, ART 132, ART 140, ART 141, ART 276 (formerly 142), ART 145, ART 147, ART 148, ART 150, ART 151, ART 222, ART 272 (formerly 156), ART 231, ART 232, ART 235, ART 241, ART 242, ART 250, ART 253, ART 254, ART 255, ART 261, ART 262, ART 273, ART 274, ART 275, ASL 201, ASL 202, ASL 291, ASL 292, COM 121, COM 131, COM 150, COM 205, COM 214, COM 235, EMS 111, EMS 112, EMS 118, EMS 124, EMS 125, EMS 225, DFS 101, DFS 104, DFS 108 (formerly 106), DFS 205, ENG 201, ENG 202, ENG 203, ENG 211, ENG 212, ENG 214, ENG 215, ENG 216, ENG 217, ENG 218, ENG 223, ENG 224, ENG 226, ENG 227, ENG 230, ENG 231, ENG 232, ENG 235, ENG 237, ENG 245, ENG 250, FRH 201, FRH 202, FRH 205, FRH 206, GER 205, HIS 101, HIS 102, HIS 103, HIS 104, HIS 105, HIS 107, HIS 109, HIS 108, HIS 111, HIS 112, HIS 121, HIS 130, HIS 150, HIS 162, HIS 220, HIS 225, HIS 250, HIS 260, HON 206, HUM 206, MUS 100, MUS 105, MUS 106, MUS 107, MUS 110, MUS 126, MUS 140, MUS 150, MUS 208, MUS 209, MUS 250, MUS 259, MUS 260, PHI 100, PHI 101, PHI 103, PHI 110, PHI 120, PHI 130, PHI 140, PHI 230, SPA 201, SPA 202, SPA 203, SPA 204, SPA 205, SPA 206, SPA 110, SPA 210, SPA 211, SPA 212, SPA 214, THE 100, THE 110, THE 124, THE 125, THE 212, THE 213, THE 227, THE 235, THE 237
Humanities [C] Electives ART 101, ART 110, ART 121, ART 122, ART 123, ART 124, ART 131, ART 132, ART 140, ART 141, ART 276 (formerly 142), ART 145, ART 147, ART 148, ART 150, ART 151, ART 222, ART 272 (formerly 156), ART 231, ART 232, ART 235, ART 241, ART 242, ART 250, ART 253, ART 254, ART 255, ART 261, ART 262, ART 273, ART 274, ART 275, ASL 201, ASL 202, ASL 291, ASL 292, COM 121, COM 131, COM 150, COM 205, COM 214, COM 235, EMS 111, EMS 112, EMS 118, EMS 124, EMS 125, EMS 225, DFS 101, DFS 104, DFS 108 (formerly 106), DFS 205, ENG 201, ENG 202, ENG 203, ENG 211, ENG 212, ENG 214, ENG 215, ENG 216, ENG 217, ENG 218, ENG 223, ENG 224, ENG 226, ENG 227, ENG 230, ENG 231, ENG 232, ENG 235, ENG 237, ENG 245, ENG 250, FRH 201, FRH 202, FRH 205, FRH 206, GER 205, HIS 101, HIS 102, HIS 103, HIS 104, HIS 105, HIS 107, HIS 109, HIS 108, HIS 111, HIS 112, HIS 121, HIS 130, HIS 150, HIS 162, HIS 220, HIS 225, HIS 250, HIS 260, HON 206, HUM 206, MUS 100, MUS 105, MUS 106, MUS 107, MUS 110, MUS 126, MUS 140, MUS 150, MUS 208, MUS 209, MUS 250, MUS 259, MUS 260, PHI 100, PHI 101, PHI 103, PHI 110, PHI 120, PHI 130, PHI 140, PHI 230, SPA 201, SPA 202, SPA 203, SPA 204, SPA 205, SPA 206, SPA 110, SPA 210, SPA 211, SPA 212, SPA 214, THE 100, THE 110, THE 124, THE 125, THE 212, THE 213, THE 227, THE 235, THE 237
Humanities [C] Electives ART 101, ART 110, ART 121, ART 122, ART 123, ART 124, ART 131, ART 132, ART 140, ART 141, ART 276 (formerly 142), ART 145, ART 147, ART 148, ART 150, ART 151, ART 222, ART 272 (formerly 156), ART 231, ART 232, ART 235, ART 241, ART 242, ART 250, ART 253, ART 254, ART 255, ART 261, ART 262, ART 273, ART 274, ART 275, ASL 201, ASL 202, ASL 291, ASL 292, COM 121, COM 131, COM 150, COM 205, COM 214, COM 235, EMS 111, EMS 112, EMS 118, EMS 124, EMS 125, EMS 225, DFS 101, DFS 104, DFS 108 (formerly 106), DFS 205, ENG 201, ENG 202, ENG 203, ENG 211, ENG 212, ENG 214, ENG 215, ENG 216, ENG 217, ENG 218, ENG 223, ENG 224, ENG 226, ENG 227, ENG 230, ENG 231, ENG 232, ENG 235, ENG 237, ENG 245, ENG 250, FRH 201, FRH 202, FRH 205, FRH 206, GER 205, HIS 101, HIS 102, HIS 103, HIS 104, HIS 105, HIS 107, HIS 109, HIS 108, HIS 111, HIS 112, HIS 121, HIS 130, HIS 150, HIS 162, HIS 220, HIS 225, HIS 250, HIS 260, HON 206, HUM 206, MUS 100, MUS 105, MUS 106, MUS 107, MUS 110, MUS 126, MUS 140, MUS 150, MUS 208, MUS 209, MUS 250, MUS 259, MUS 260, PHI 100, PHI 101, PHI 103, PHI 110, PHI 120, PHI 130, PHI 140, PHI 230, SPA 201, SPA 202, SPA 203, SPA 204, SPA 205, SPA 206, SPA 110, SPA 210, SPA 211, SPA 212, SPA 214, THE 100, THE 110, THE 124, THE 125, THE 212, THE 213, THE 227, THE 235, THE 237
A scientific examination of human social phenomena. Major topics include interaction, statuses and roles, groups, social institutions, culture, socialization, social control, conforming and deviant behavior, collective behavior, social inequality, demography, social change, urbanism, industrialism and globalization.Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101
This course provides a rigorous introduction to the living processes within cells by exploring the chemical and molecular basis of life. Emphasis is placed on basic chemistry, cell structure, and the important types of biochemical reactions, which occur during growth, development, maintenance, and reproduction in cells. Particular detail is given to biochemical processes in human cells. Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture emphasizing the scientific method and inquiry based learning. 3 class hours and 3 laboratory hoursPrerequisite: ENG 101 Eligible and MTH 095 Eligible or Permission of Instructor.Note: This course is designed to prepare students for further study in biological science and health-allied programs. Credit cannot be received for more than one of these, except by permission of department chair: BIO 103, BIO 107.
A study of the biology of microorganisms including bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa, algae, and parasitic animals. The effects of microbial activities on humans and the environment will be considered. Other topics include the use of microbes in biotechnology, the control of microbial growth, applied immunology, epidemiology, and pathogenesis. Laboratory experience is provided in aseptic techniques, microscopy, staining, environmental microbiology, identification of microbes, recombinant DNA technology, and pathogenic organisms.Prerequisite: BIO 100 or BIO 103 or BIO 107 or BIO 110 or BIO 120.
Graphical description of data, measures of central tendency and variability, probability and probability distributions, central limit theorem, estimation of parameters, testing hypotheses, regression and correlation, analysis of variance, and other topics in statistical inference. Prerequisite: MTH 085 or MTH 099 with a grade of C- or better; or SM12, or adequate score on the Mathematics Placement Examination.

Program Requirements

26 CREDITS
A detailed study of the structure and function of the human body. Physical and chemical principles, as they apply to the comprehensive treatment of human physiology, form an integral part of the course. Content includes general introductory material, tissues, integumentary, skeletal, muscular and nervous systems. A majors course designed for nursing, physical education, radiologic technology and other allied-health majors. Some dissection of preserved animal specimen material is included. Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in BIO 107 taken within 7 years or a passing score on the challenge exam.
A continuation of Anatomy & Physiology I (BIO 217), concentrating on cardiovascular, lymphatic, immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems. Emphasis is placed on the correlation and integration of all the body systems. Substantial dissection of preserved animal specimen material is included. Prerequisite: BIO 217
This course is recommended as a preparation for future chemistry courses. A study of scientific method; chemical laws and theories; electronic, atomic, and molecular structure and their underlying experimental basis; chemical bonding; periodic table relationships; quantitative and stoichiometric relationships; thermochemistry; gas laws; liquid state; and solutions. Qualitative and quantitative laboratory work supports lecture discussion. Prerequisite: MTH 095 or MTH 099, with a grade of C- or higher, or equivalent self-paced level (SM18), or algebra placement test score of 82 or higher. High school chemistry is recommended.
A study of properties of solutions, electrolytes, ionization, oxidation-reduction, electrochemistry, kinetics, energy, thermodynamics, principles of chemical equilibria including ionic equilibria and solubility product, hydrolysis, acid-base theories, nuclear chemistry, and descriptive chemistry. Qualitative and quantitative laboratory work supports lecture discussion. Prerequisites: CHM 113 or CHM 121 or equivalent with a grade of C- or better.
A study of the chemistry of carbon compounds. Lectures cover the chemistry of the principal classes of the aliphatic hydrocarbons including nomenclature, molecular structure, stereochemistry, and reactivity. Stress is placed on the relationship among molecular structure, stereochemistry, and chemical reactions of these compounds. Laboratory includes classical techniques of separation and identification of organic compounds as well as modern techniques of instrumentation. Prerequisite: CHM 124 or CHM 114 or CHM 102 (with permission of instructor) with a grade of C or better.
An introduction to the science of nutrition as it applies to everyday life. Students will learn how to apply the logic of science to their own nutritional concerns. Topics include the six major nutrients: carbohydrates, fats, proteins, vitamins, minerals, and water. The course also will examine energy balance, weight control, the digestive process, nutrition fads, supplements, fiber, and disease as it relates to nutrition and fitness. A dietary computer application is used throughout the semester to track personal dietary, energy, and fitness. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101.
An introduction to the science of nutrition for nutrition majors. Topics include the six essential nutrients: carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, vitamins, minerals, and water. For each nutrient, the following is discussed: chemical structures, physical characteristics, digestion, absorption, and metabolism, role in the body, effects of deficiency and excess, food sources, and human requirements at various life stages.Prerequisites: BIO 100, BIO 107, BIO 217 Prerequisite or Corequisite: CHM 221


Students interested in transferring to Dietetics Programs should consider MGT 230 and MGT 231

Students interested in transferring to Nutrition Research Programs should consider CHM 222.

This program qualifies for MassTransfer, which guarantees credit transfer to Massachusetts state colleges and universities. MassTransfer also will grant students automatic acceptance to certain state colleges and universities by achieving the minimum grade point average and the HCC degree.