Courses & Programs

Psychology

The Psychology Option is a transfer curriculum that prepares students for transfer to a four-year college with a major in psychology.

Terri Kinstle

Chair, Psychology

Social Sciences

Fine and Performing Arts 222

413.552.2469 (Tel)


What will you learn?

The Psychology Option is a transfer curriculum that prepares students for transfer to a four-year college with a major in psychology. The curriculum also benefits individuals who want to pursue professional careers in social work, human services, law enforcement, personnel administration, counseling, etc.

PROGRAM OUTCOMES

All psychology courses offered each semester address the general education outcomes of HCC.  These outcomes currently include:

  • Effective Communication
  • Critical Thinking
  • Knowledge of Diversity
  • Information Literacy
  • Quantitative Reasoning

Additionally, coursework in psychology also addresses the student learning goals and outcomes developed by the Psychology Department in accordance with the American Psychological Association's revised guidelines for undergraduate programs in psychology.  These department-level student learning goals and outcomes currently include:

  • Knowledge Base in Psychology
  • Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking
  • Ethical and Social Responsibility in a Diverse World
  • Communication
  • Professional Development

What will you do?

Continue your education at a four-year college or university, or enter the workforce! Careers in psychology include:

  • Direct Care
  • Administration
  • Research
  • Education
  • Human Resources

Learn more at HCC's Advising, Career and Transfer Center and at What Can I Do With This Major?

61 total credits

36 credits General Education Requirements + 10-13 credits Program Requirements

Depending on course selection, 80% of this program can be completed online.


General Education Requirements

36 CREDITS
This course is the first half of the college composition sequence and focuses on close reading, critical thinking, beginning research skills, and the writing process. Students will read, analyze, and cite a range of nonfiction texts. Students will produce several formal essays totaling approximately 3000 words. Prerequisite: Appropriate scores on English placement tests or C- or higher in ENG 095.
This course is the second half of the first-year composition sequence and focuses on close reading, critical thinking, academic writing, research, and the writing process. Students will locate and evaluate both primary and secondary sources, and will gain skill in summarizing and synthesizing source material while employing MLA documentation. Texts will include a range of nonfiction (articles, essays, scholarly sources) and literary works. Students will produce at least 3000 words of formal written work, including a documented essay of at least 1250 words. Prerequisite: ENG 101 with a grade of C-or higher.
Introduction to the study and principles of behavior. Topics include general principles of scientific investigation; physiological bases of behavior including sensation, perception, learning, emotion, and motivation; development; individual differences; attitudes; and group dynamics. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101.
An introduction to research methods in psychology or related fields. Covers literature reviews, critical evaluations of articles in professional journals, the design of research studies, and use of a computer-based statistical package to analyze data. Independent research focuses on the procedures involved in conducting studies and writing research reports. Group laboratory exercises are included. Prerequisites: PSY 110 and PSY 142 Corequisite: PSY 200
Select from the following courses: ANT 101, ANT 103, ANT 110, ANT 114, ANT 120, ANT 130, ANT 150, ANT 250, COM 212, CRJ 110, CRJ 117, CRJ 200, CRJ 208, CRJ 209, CRJ 210, CRJ 217, ECN 100, ECN 101, ECN 102, ECN 104, ECN 105, ECN 120, ECN150, ECN 250, GEO 110, GRT 110, HON 206, HSV 120, HSV 205, HSV 208, HSV 212, HSV 226, HSV 230, LAW 215, POL 101, POL 110, POL 120, POL 125, POL 126, POL 140, POL 150, POL 230, PSY 110, PSY 202, PSY 203, PSY 210, PSY 215, PSY 216, PSY 217, PSY 218, PSY 220, PSY 222, PSY 224, PSY 225, PSY 226, PSY 230, PSY 233, PSY 240, PSY 242, PSY 250, PSY 260, PSY 265, PSY 270, SOC 110, SOC 130, SOC 150, SOC 204, SOC 208, SOC 213, SOC 214, SOC 215, SOC 216, SOC 220, SOC 240, SOC250, SSN 120, SSN 230, WST 100, WST 215, WST 217
Humanities [C] Electives ART 101, ART 110, ART 121, ART 122, ART 123, ART 124, ART 131, ART 132, ART 140, ART 141, ART 276 (formerly 142), ART 145, ART 147, ART 148, ART 150, ART 151, ART 222, ART 272 (formerly 156), ART 231, ART 232, ART 235, ART 241, ART 242, ART 250, ART 253, ART 254, ART 255, ART 261, ART 262, ART 273, ART 274, ART 275, ASL 201, ASL 202, ASL 291, ASL 292, COM 121, COM 131, COM 150, COM 205, COM 214, COM 235, EMS 111, EMS 112, EMS 118, EMS 124, EMS 125, EMS 225, DFS 101, DFS 104, DFS 108 (formerly 106), DFS 205, ENG 201, ENG 202, ENG 203, ENG 211, ENG 212, ENG 214, ENG 215, ENG 216, ENG 217, ENG 218, ENG 223, ENG 224, ENG 226, ENG 227, ENG 230, ENG 231, ENG 232, ENG 235, ENG 237, ENG 245, ENG 250, FRH 201, FRH 202, FRH 205, FRH 206, GER 205, HIS 101, HIS 102, HIS 103, HIS 104, HIS 105, HIS 107, HIS 109, HIS 108, HIS 111, HIS 112, HIS 121, HIS 130, HIS 150, HIS 162, HIS 220, HIS 225, HIS 250, HIS 260, HON 206, HUM 206, MUS 100, MUS 105, MUS 106, MUS 107, MUS 110, MUS 126, MUS 140, MUS 150, MUS 208, MUS 209, MUS 250, MUS 259, MUS 260, PHI 100, PHI 101, PHI 103, PHI 110, PHI 120, PHI 130, PHI 140, PHI 230, SPA 201, SPA 202, SPA 203, SPA 204, SPA 205, SPA 206, SPA 110, SPA 210, SPA 211, SPA 212, SPA 214, THE 100, THE 110, THE 124, THE 125, THE 212, THE 213, THE 227, THE 235, THE 237
Humanities [C] Electives ART 101, ART 110, ART 121, ART 122, ART 123, ART 124, ART 131, ART 132, ART 140, ART 141, ART 276 (formerly 142), ART 145, ART 147, ART 148, ART 150, ART 151, ART 222, ART 272 (formerly 156), ART 231, ART 232, ART 235, ART 241, ART 242, ART 250, ART 253, ART 254, ART 255, ART 261, ART 262, ART 273, ART 274, ART 275, ASL 201, ASL 202, ASL 291, ASL 292, COM 121, COM 131, COM 150, COM 205, COM 214, COM 235, EMS 111, EMS 112, EMS 118, EMS 124, EMS 125, EMS 225, DFS 101, DFS 104, DFS 108 (formerly 106), DFS 205, ENG 201, ENG 202, ENG 203, ENG 211, ENG 212, ENG 214, ENG 215, ENG 216, ENG 217, ENG 218, ENG 223, ENG 224, ENG 226, ENG 227, ENG 230, ENG 231, ENG 232, ENG 235, ENG 237, ENG 245, ENG 250, FRH 201, FRH 202, FRH 205, FRH 206, GER 205, HIS 101, HIS 102, HIS 103, HIS 104, HIS 105, HIS 107, HIS 109, HIS 108, HIS 111, HIS 112, HIS 121, HIS 130, HIS 150, HIS 162, HIS 220, HIS 225, HIS 250, HIS 260, HON 206, HUM 206, MUS 100, MUS 105, MUS 106, MUS 107, MUS 110, MUS 126, MUS 140, MUS 150, MUS 208, MUS 209, MUS 250, MUS 259, MUS 260, PHI 100, PHI 101, PHI 103, PHI 110, PHI 120, PHI 130, PHI 140, PHI 230, SPA 201, SPA 202, SPA 203, SPA 204, SPA 205, SPA 206, SPA 110, SPA 210, SPA 211, SPA 212, SPA 214, THE 100, THE 110, THE 124, THE 125, THE 212, THE 213, THE 227, THE 235, THE 237
Humanities [C] Electives ART 101, ART 110, ART 121, ART 122, ART 123, ART 124, ART 131, ART 132, ART 140, ART 141, ART 276 (formerly 142), ART 145, ART 147, ART 148, ART 150, ART 151, ART 222, ART 272 (formerly 156), ART 231, ART 232, ART 235, ART 241, ART 242, ART 250, ART 253, ART 254, ART 255, ART 261, ART 262, ART 273, ART 274, ART 275, ASL 201, ASL 202, ASL 291, ASL 292, COM 121, COM 131, COM 150, COM 205, COM 214, COM 235, EMS 111, EMS 112, EMS 118, EMS 124, EMS 125, EMS 225, DFS 101, DFS 104, DFS 108 (formerly 106), DFS 205, ENG 201, ENG 202, ENG 203, ENG 211, ENG 212, ENG 214, ENG 215, ENG 216, ENG 217, ENG 218, ENG 223, ENG 224, ENG 226, ENG 227, ENG 230, ENG 231, ENG 232, ENG 235, ENG 237, ENG 245, ENG 250, FRH 201, FRH 202, FRH 205, FRH 206, GER 205, HIS 101, HIS 102, HIS 103, HIS 104, HIS 105, HIS 107, HIS 109, HIS 108, HIS 111, HIS 112, HIS 121, HIS 130, HIS 150, HIS 162, HIS 220, HIS 225, HIS 250, HIS 260, HON 206, HUM 206, MUS 100, MUS 105, MUS 106, MUS 107, MUS 110, MUS 126, MUS 140, MUS 150, MUS 208, MUS 209, MUS 250, MUS 259, MUS 260, PHI 100, PHI 101, PHI 103, PHI 110, PHI 120, PHI 130, PHI 140, PHI 230, SPA 201, SPA 202, SPA 203, SPA 204, SPA 205, SPA 206, SPA 110, SPA 210, SPA 211, SPA 212, SPA 214, THE 100, THE 110, THE 124, THE 125, THE 212, THE 213, THE 227, THE 235, THE 237
A general introduction to the human body stressing health vs. disease. In addition to an overview of the structure and function of various cells, tissues, organs, and organ systems, many social and ethical issues will be addressed. Each organ system will be examined with an emphasis on the integration of all of the systems. Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture, offering a hands-on approach and some experimentation. The lab includes dissection of (or observation of) preserved animal specimens. NOTE: This course does not satisfy the requirement of programs requiring a full year of anatomy and physiology.
A detailed study of the structure and function of the human body. Physical and chemical principles, as they apply to the comprehensive treatment of human physiology, form an integral part of the course. Content includes general introductory material, tissues, integumentary, skeletal, muscular and nervous systems. A majors course designed for nursing, physical education, radiologic technology and other allied-health majors. Some dissection of preserved animal specimen material is included. Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in BIO 107 taken within 7 years or a passing score on the challenge exam.
Laboratory Science [E] ElectivesAST 110, AST 140, BIO 101, BIO 102, BIO 106, BIO 107, BIO 108, BIO 110, BIO 111, BIO 114, BIO 120, BIO 130, BIO 215, BIO 217, BIO 218, BIO 222, BIO 223, BIO 229, BIO 230, BIO 243, CHM 101, CHM 102, CHM 113, CHM 114, CHM 121, CHM 124, CHM 221, CHM 222, CHM 224, EGR 110, EGR 111, ESC 111, ESC 115, ESC 120, ESC 130, ENV 120, ENV 124, ENV 137, ENV 138, ENV 140, ENV 253, FRS 100, FRS 101, FRS 110, FRS 201, PHS 101, PHS 102, PHS 111, PHS 112, PHS 201, SEM 110, SEM 111, SEM 116, SEM 130, SUS 101, SUS 102, SUS 103, SUS 116, SUS 216
An introduction to statistics for students interested in careers in psychology or related fields. Descriptive and inferential statistics are applied to psychological and social problems. Topics include probability theory, descriptive statistics, the binomial and normal distributions, confidence intervals, chi-square tests, t-tests, analysis of variance, correlation, and simple regression. A computer-based statistical package is used to analyze data. Prerequisites: PSY 110, and MTH 095 or MTH 099 with a grade of C- or better or SM18, or adequate score on the Mathematics Placement Examination.

Program Requirements

10-13 CREDITS
An introduction to information literacy concepts specific to the discipline of psychology, including: library research strategies, with an emphasis on database searching; American Psychological Association (APA) editorial style; determining quality and credibility of information sources; and conceptualization and expression of psychological ideas through scientific writing.Prerequisites: PSY 110 and PSY 142 Corequisite: PSY 222
Facts and principles of child development including maturational, emotional, intellectual-cognitive, verbal, and social factors at various ages. Theories regarding personality development and intellectual growth are examined. Prerequisite: PSY 110
A study of human development with emphasis on the broad physical, maturational, and behavioral changes occurring throughout the life span and the factors and conditions that influence these changes. Prerequisite: PSY 110
An exploration of adolescent changes including physical, maturational, cognitive, social, and emotional factors. Adolescent development is also viewed from various theoretical points of view. Vocational and educational developments are considered. Prerequisite: PSY 110
Examines the psychological development and functioning of the older adult, looking specifically at how the aging process affects the psychological functioning and behavior of the individual. It will address both the biological and behavioral factors of the aging personality and mental functioning with a goal of preparing the student to understand and effectively work with the older adult. Prerequisite: PSY 110
An introduction to the study, principles and findings of Social Psychology. Topics include methods of research; social perception (self-perception, perception of others and perceiving groups); social influence (attitudes and conformity); social relations (attractions, altruism and aggression) and applying social psychology (law, business and health). Prerequisite: PSY 110
Psychological disorders, including mood, anxiety, neurodevelopmental, obsessive-compulsive, trauma and stressor-related, somatic, dissociative, psychotic, and personality disorders. Major theoretical perspectives, causes, symptoms, treatments, cultural considerations, and experiences of people with disorders will be discussed.Prerequisite: PSY 110
An introduction to human cognition. Topics include how cognitive psychologists study human thought processes and research findings in perception, attention, memory, language, problem solving, and intelligence. Prerequisite: PSY 110
This course provides an overview of the major theories of personality and the contributions each has made to our understanding of human behavior. Prerequisite: PSY 110
An introduction to the neural foundations for behavior. Topics include how neuroscientists and cognitive neuroscientists study the brain and nervous system, the organization of the brain and nervous system, the major brain circuits and brain functions, and some major brain diseases and disorders. Prerequisite: PSY 110. An introductory biology course is also recommended.
This is a survey of the emerging field of ecopsychology, an integration of ecology and psychology. By drawing upon the science of ecology to re-examine the human psyche as an integral part of nature, ecopsychology attempts to inspire lifestyles that are both ecologically sustainable and psychologically healthy. This course provides an overview of the psychological principles and practices relevant to environmental education and action, while exploring the contributions of ecological thinking and values of the natural world to psychotherapy and personal growth. Prerequisite: PSY 110
The study of diverse human sexual behaviors, thoughts, attitudes and feelings from a biopsychosocial perspective. Includes relevant theories, research findings and contemporary controversies related to sexuality, as well as topics designed to encourage personal growth and good health. Prerequisite: PSY 110
A study of the principles of development, learning, and measurement applied to educational situations. Examination of contemporary theories of learning. Prerequisite: PSY 110
An exploration of some of the psychological issues relevant to women. Theories of female psychology and research findings will be considered, as will biological, social and cultural factors that affect females. Topics to be discussed may include female life span development; gender identity; gender differences in mental health and sexuality; sexism; and violence against women. This course is designed for both female and male students who are interested in learning about women's lives from a bio psychosocial perspective. Prerequisite: PSY 110
An exploration of what it means to be a man and what society expects of males. Current theories of male psychology and masculinity from multicultural, biological, and psychosocial perspectives will be considered. Topics include: gender identity and gender roles; how boys learn to become men; absent fathers and father-hunger; competition, success and work; violence and aggression; sexuality and homophobia; patriarchy, privilege and power; relationships and intimacy; family roles and fatherhood; physical and mental health issues. The course is designed for both men and women who are interested in learning about men, as well as men's roles in the family, at work, and in society. Prerequisite: PSY 110
An examination of how biological, psychological, and social systems interact with physical and mental health. Topics may include research in health psychology; health disparities across diverse groups; the effects of, and coping with, stress; lifestyle choices such as diet and exercise; health behaviors; illness and injury; prevention efforts; utilization of the health care system; pain management; and the development and treatment of chronic diseases.Prerequisites: PSY 110, ENG 101
Surveys the psychological literature and uses primary source materials to explore a current and/or historical topic in psychology. Includes a research project. The focus of the course will change each semester. Prerequisites: PSY 110, ENG 101 and others appropriate to the topic as announced
An introduction to forensic psychology, the interface of psychology and law. The psychological underpinnings of the legal system, as well as the various roles and responsibilities of psychologists within the legal arena, are examined. Topics include insanity, competency, eyewitness identification, jury selection, capital punishment, violence and risk assessment, and child custody.Prerequisite: PSY 110
An introduction to instruments, techniques, and theories of counseling. Procedures such as observation, individual appraisal, and case reports are presented in the context of philosophies and issues in counseling. Prerequisite: PSY 110
Examines how the major theoretical frameworks in psychology relate to sport. The focus is on how an understanding of psychological concepts such as achievement, motivation, personality theory, aggression, and anxiety can be used to facilitate the athlete's enjoyment and performance in sport. Prerequisite: PSY 110

12-15 CREDITS OF ELECTIVES


Students can choose any Arts and Science electives, EXCEPT for Psychology courses.

A&S  XX1  |  Arts and Science Elective
Credits: 3

A&S  XX1  |   Arts and Science Elective
Credits: 3

A&S  XX1  |   Arts and Science Elective
Credits: 3

Six credits needed to complete 61 credit graduation requirement. Choose any in the HCC catalog EXCEPT Psychology courses. 

General Elective
Credits: 1-3

General Elective
Credits: 1-3


Only six non-Arts and Science credits may be taken towards an A.A. degree.

This program qualifies for Mass Transfer, which guarantees credit transfer to Massachusetts state colleges and universities.  Mass Transfer also will grant students automatic acceptance to certain state colleges and universities by achieving the minimum grade point average and the HCC degree.

Program Requirements: It is recommended that students do not take more psychology courses than required by the psychology program. Most four-year colleges and universities limit the number of psychology course credits accepted from institutions prior to transfer in order to ensure that students complete a sufficient number of psychology credits after transfer.

Students transferring to the University of Massachusetts, please note The College of Natural Science foreign language requirement: Satisfactory completion in high school or college of either a fourth-level foreign language course, or of a third-level course in one language and a second-level course in another language.