Courses & Programs

Sociology

The Sociology Option is intended for students desiring a solid liberal arts education as well as those interested in transferring to four-year colleges in the social sciences.

Tracy Ross

Chair, Sociology

Social Sciences

Donahue 251

413.552.2348 (Tel)


What will you learn?

Students select courses from areas such as family, religion, government, the environment, social changes, social deviance, social problems, substance abuse, social inequality, diversity,disability, race, class and gender.

The Department of Sociology at Holyoke Community College seeks to provide a thorough grounding in the historical and theoretical development of the field of sociology and to give students the tools to make this knowledge relevant to the world around them. The Sociology program provides the opportunity to combine a liberal arts education with a unique focus on the study of human societies including social dynamics, institutions, diversity, and inequality. Through its use of scientific methods and systematic theory, sociologists seek to identify and explain the underlying patterns of social relations. This knowledge base allows students to gain insights into and challenge assumptions about the fundamental elements of human systems behavior. Sociologists are particularly concerned with understanding diversity in our social world and addressing inequality.

What will you do?

Continue your education at a four-year college or university, or enter the workforce! The program is designed to prepare students for professional careers in a number of arenas, including research, education, social work, human services, law enforcement, probation and corrections, government, non-profit organizations, labor relations, business management, personnel administration and market analysis.

Learn more at HCC's Advising, Career & Transfer Center and at What Can I Do With This Major?

60-62 total credits

35 credits General Education Requirements + Recommended course choice: SOC 213, 214, 215, 220, & 235. Choose any five SOC courses to equal 15. credits Program Requirements

Depending on course selection, 80% of this program can be completed online.


General Education Requirements

35 CREDITS
This course is the first half of the college composition sequence and focuses on close reading, critical thinking, beginning research skills, and the writing process. Students will read, analyze, and cite a range of nonfiction texts. Students will produce several formal essays totaling approximately 3000 words. Prerequisite: Appropriate scores on English placement tests or C- or higher in ENG 095.
This course is the second half of the first-year composition sequence and focuses on close reading, critical thinking, academic writing, research, and the writing process. Students will locate and evaluate both primary and secondary sources, and will gain skill in summarizing and synthesizing source material while employing MLA documentation. Texts will include a range of nonfiction (articles, essays, scholarly sources) and literary works. Students will produce at least 3000 words of formal written work, including a documented essay of at least 1250 words. Prerequisite: ENG 101 with a grade of C-or higher.
Introduction to the study and principles of behavior. Topics include general principles of scientific investigation; physiological bases of behavior including sensation, perception, learning, emotion, and motivation; development; individual differences; attitudes; and group dynamics. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101.
A scientific examination of human social phenomena. Major topics include interaction, statuses and roles, groups, social institutions, culture, socialization, social control, conforming and deviant behavior, collective behavior, social inequality, demography, social change, urbanism, industrialism and globalization.Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101
Select from the following courses: ANT 101, ANT 103, ANT 110, ANT 114, ANT 120, ANT 130, ANT 150, ANT 250, COM 212, CRJ 110, CRJ 117, CRJ 200, CRJ 208, CRJ 209, CRJ 210, CRJ 217, ECN 100, ECN 101, ECN 102, ECN 104, ECN 105, ECN 120, ECN150, ECN 250, GEO 110, GRT 110, HON 206, HSV 120, HSV 205, HSV 208, HSV 212, HSV 226, HSV 230, LAW 215, POL 101, POL 110, POL 120, POL 125, POL 126, POL 140, POL 150, POL 230, PSY 110, PSY 202, PSY 203, PSY 210, PSY 215, PSY 216, PSY 217, PSY 218, PSY 220, PSY 222, PSY 224, PSY 225, PSY 226, PSY 230, PSY 233, PSY 240, PSY 242, PSY 250, PSY 260, PSY 265, PSY 270, SOC 110, SOC 130, SOC 150, SOC 204, SOC 208, SOC 213, SOC 214, SOC 215, SOC 216, SOC 220, SOC 240, SOC250, SSN 120, SSN 230, WST 100, WST 215, WST 217
Humanities [C] Electives ART 101, ART 110, ART 121, ART 122, ART 123, ART 124, ART 131, ART 132, ART 140, ART 141, ART 276 (formerly 142), ART 145, ART 147, ART 148, ART 150, ART 151, ART 222, ART 272 (formerly 156), ART 231, ART 232, ART 235, ART 241, ART 242, ART 250, ART 253, ART 254, ART 255, ART 261, ART 262, ART 273, ART 274, ART 275, ASL 201, ASL 202, ASL 291, ASL 292, COM 121, COM 131, COM 150, COM 205, COM 214, COM 235, EMS 111, EMS 112, EMS 118, EMS 124, EMS 125, EMS 225, DFS 101, DFS 104, DFS 108 (formerly 106), DFS 205, ENG 201, ENG 202, ENG 203, ENG 211, ENG 212, ENG 214, ENG 215, ENG 216, ENG 217, ENG 218, ENG 223, ENG 224, ENG 226, ENG 227, ENG 230, ENG 231, ENG 232, ENG 235, ENG 237, ENG 245, ENG 250, FRH 201, FRH 202, FRH 205, FRH 206, GER 205, HIS 101, HIS 102, HIS 103, HIS 104, HIS 105, HIS 107, HIS 109, HIS 108, HIS 111, HIS 112, HIS 121, HIS 130, HIS 150, HIS 162, HIS 220, HIS 225, HIS 250, HIS 260, HON 206, HUM 206, MUS 100, MUS 105, MUS 106, MUS 107, MUS 110, MUS 126, MUS 140, MUS 150, MUS 208, MUS 209, MUS 250, MUS 259, MUS 260, PHI 100, PHI 101, PHI 103, PHI 110, PHI 120, PHI 130, PHI 140, PHI 230, SPA 201, SPA 202, SPA 203, SPA 204, SPA 205, SPA 206, SPA 110, SPA 210, SPA 211, SPA 212, SPA 214, THE 100, THE 110, THE 124, THE 125, THE 212, THE 213, THE 227, THE 235, THE 237
Humanities [C] Electives ART 101, ART 110, ART 121, ART 122, ART 123, ART 124, ART 131, ART 132, ART 140, ART 141, ART 276 (formerly 142), ART 145, ART 147, ART 148, ART 150, ART 151, ART 222, ART 272 (formerly 156), ART 231, ART 232, ART 235, ART 241, ART 242, ART 250, ART 253, ART 254, ART 255, ART 261, ART 262, ART 273, ART 274, ART 275, ASL 201, ASL 202, ASL 291, ASL 292, COM 121, COM 131, COM 150, COM 205, COM 214, COM 235, EMS 111, EMS 112, EMS 118, EMS 124, EMS 125, EMS 225, DFS 101, DFS 104, DFS 108 (formerly 106), DFS 205, ENG 201, ENG 202, ENG 203, ENG 211, ENG 212, ENG 214, ENG 215, ENG 216, ENG 217, ENG 218, ENG 223, ENG 224, ENG 226, ENG 227, ENG 230, ENG 231, ENG 232, ENG 235, ENG 237, ENG 245, ENG 250, FRH 201, FRH 202, FRH 205, FRH 206, GER 205, HIS 101, HIS 102, HIS 103, HIS 104, HIS 105, HIS 107, HIS 109, HIS 108, HIS 111, HIS 112, HIS 121, HIS 130, HIS 150, HIS 162, HIS 220, HIS 225, HIS 250, HIS 260, HON 206, HUM 206, MUS 100, MUS 105, MUS 106, MUS 107, MUS 110, MUS 126, MUS 140, MUS 150, MUS 208, MUS 209, MUS 250, MUS 259, MUS 260, PHI 100, PHI 101, PHI 103, PHI 110, PHI 120, PHI 130, PHI 140, PHI 230, SPA 201, SPA 202, SPA 203, SPA 204, SPA 205, SPA 206, SPA 110, SPA 210, SPA 211, SPA 212, SPA 214, THE 100, THE 110, THE 124, THE 125, THE 212, THE 213, THE 227, THE 235, THE 237
Humanities [C] Electives ART 101, ART 110, ART 121, ART 122, ART 123, ART 124, ART 131, ART 132, ART 140, ART 141, ART 276 (formerly 142), ART 145, ART 147, ART 148, ART 150, ART 151, ART 222, ART 272 (formerly 156), ART 231, ART 232, ART 235, ART 241, ART 242, ART 250, ART 253, ART 254, ART 255, ART 261, ART 262, ART 273, ART 274, ART 275, ASL 201, ASL 202, ASL 291, ASL 292, COM 121, COM 131, COM 150, COM 205, COM 214, COM 235, EMS 111, EMS 112, EMS 118, EMS 124, EMS 125, EMS 225, DFS 101, DFS 104, DFS 108 (formerly 106), DFS 205, ENG 201, ENG 202, ENG 203, ENG 211, ENG 212, ENG 214, ENG 215, ENG 216, ENG 217, ENG 218, ENG 223, ENG 224, ENG 226, ENG 227, ENG 230, ENG 231, ENG 232, ENG 235, ENG 237, ENG 245, ENG 250, FRH 201, FRH 202, FRH 205, FRH 206, GER 205, HIS 101, HIS 102, HIS 103, HIS 104, HIS 105, HIS 107, HIS 109, HIS 108, HIS 111, HIS 112, HIS 121, HIS 130, HIS 150, HIS 162, HIS 220, HIS 225, HIS 250, HIS 260, HON 206, HUM 206, MUS 100, MUS 105, MUS 106, MUS 107, MUS 110, MUS 126, MUS 140, MUS 150, MUS 208, MUS 209, MUS 250, MUS 259, MUS 260, PHI 100, PHI 101, PHI 103, PHI 110, PHI 120, PHI 130, PHI 140, PHI 230, SPA 201, SPA 202, SPA 203, SPA 204, SPA 205, SPA 206, SPA 110, SPA 210, SPA 211, SPA 212, SPA 214, THE 100, THE 110, THE 124, THE 125, THE 212, THE 213, THE 227, THE 235, THE 237
Laboratory Science [E] ElectivesAST 110, AST 140, BIO 101, BIO 102, BIO 106, BIO 107, BIO 108, BIO 110, BIO 111, BIO 114, BIO 120, BIO 130, BIO 215, BIO 217, BIO 218, BIO 222, BIO 223, BIO 229, BIO 230, BIO 243, CHM 101, CHM 102, CHM 113, CHM 114, CHM 121, CHM 124, CHM 221, CHM 222, CHM 224, EGR 110, EGR 111, ESC 111, ESC 115, ESC 120, ESC 130, ENV 120, ENV 124, ENV 137, ENV 138, ENV 140, ENV 253, FRS 100, FRS 101, FRS 110, FRS 201, PHS 101, PHS 102, PHS 111, PHS 112, PHS 201, SEM 110, SEM 111, SEM 116, SEM 130, SUS 101, SUS 102, SUS 103, SUS 116, SUS 216
Laboratory Science [E] ElectivesAST 110, AST 140, BIO 101, BIO 102, BIO 106, BIO 107, BIO 108, BIO 110, BIO 111, BIO 114, BIO 120, BIO 130, BIO 215, BIO 217, BIO 218, BIO 222, BIO 223, BIO 229, BIO 230, BIO 243, CHM 101, CHM 102, CHM 113, CHM 114, CHM 121, CHM 124, CHM 221, CHM 222, CHM 224, EGR 110, EGR 111, ESC 110, ESC 111, ESC 115, ESC 120, ESC 130, ENV 120, ENV 124, ENV 137, ENV 138, ENV 140, ENV 253, FRS 100, FRS 101, FRS 110, FRS 201, PHS 101, PHS 102, PHS 111, PHS 112, PHS 201, SEM 110, SEM 111, SEM 116, SEM 130, SUS 101, SUS 102, SUS 103, SUS 116, SUS 216
An introduction to statistics for students interested in careers in psychology or related fields. Descriptive and inferential statistics are applied to psychological and social problems. Topics include probability theory, descriptive statistics, the binomial and normal distributions, confidence intervals, chi-square tests, t-tests, analysis of variance, correlation, and simple regression. A computer-based statistical package is used to analyze data. Prerequisites: PSY 110, and MTH 095 or MTH 099 with a grade of C- or better or SM18, or adequate score on the Mathematics Placement Examination.

Program Requirements

Recommended course choice: SOC 213, 214, 215, 220, & 235. Choose any five SOC courses to equal 15. CREDITS
A sociological examination of urban phenomena around the world with special emphasis upon urban conditions in the United States. Particular attention is given to the urban revolution, the nature of the city, the history of urban developments, spatial and physical aspects of the urban environment, urban social structure, urban social institutions, and urban social problems. Prerequisite: SOC 110
A sociological examination of the nature, causes and consequences of, and potential solutions for, social problems. Attention will be focused on problems of deviant behavior, structural problems, problems of inequality, institutional problems, and global survival problems. Prerequisite: SOC 110
An introduction to sociological perspectives on the complex historical processes that contribute to the social construction of gender. This course examines different theories generated to explain the system of inequalities in the United States. Particular attention will be given to the intersection of gender, sexuality, class ethnicity, and race. Social change and the place of feminism in that change will be a central focus of the course.Prerequisite: SOC 110
The relationships among different racial and ethnic groups and the dominant culture in the United States from a socio-historical perspective. Particular attention will be given to such concepts as dominant-minority group relations, racism, discrimination, ethnicity, immigration, assimilation, and pluralism. Some of the groups analyzed are African-Americans, Hispanic-Americans, Jewish-Americans, Asian-Americans, and Native Americans. Prerequisite: SOC 110
This course provides a sociological framework for understanding families in our society. The course will examine the dynamic nature of family in contemporary and historical contexts. Students will be encouraged to explore the linkages between family relationships and the larger social conditions in which families develop. Special emphasis will be placed on the family as it intersects with economic, political, technological, social, and cultural influences. Prerequisite: SOC 110
In this course students will survey classic sociological theorists and concepts. Current and/or historical topics are examined through the lenses of relevant scholarship in sociology. The focus of this course may change each time it is offered.
Information about and problems of death and dying from a sociological perspective. Major topics include the demography of death; cross cultural, subcultural, and religious views of death and dying; sociological analysis of funerals; aging and death; and the dying patient and caring institutions. Prerequisite: SOC 110
This courses introduces concepts relevant to the diagnosis and treatment of substance abuse, including the disease concept; the effect of alcohol and other drugs on the body; medical complications; the effect of substance abuse problems on the family and others; and special issues related to populations such as adolescents, individuals at risk for suicide, women, the elderly, and individuals with a dual diagnosis. Same as HSV 208. Prerequisite: PSY 110 or SOC 110
In this course students will survey the sociological literature and use primary source materials to explore a current and/or historic topic in sociology. The focus of the course may change each semester. Students will be expected to complete a research project. Prerequisites: SOC 110 and others appropriate to the topic when the course is announced

10 CREDITS OF ELECTIVES


Choose any AS elective or two non AS electives sufficient to complete 60 credit graduation requirement

Program Elective
Credits: 3

Program Elective
Credits: 3

Program Elective
Credits: 3

Program Elective
Credits: 1-3


Program Electives - Only six non-Arts and Science credits may be taken towards an A.A. degree.

This program qualifies for MassTransfer, which guarantees credit transfer to Massachusetts state colleges and universities. MassTransfer also will grant students automatic acceptance to certain state colleges and universities by achieving the minimum grade point average and the HCC degree.

Re: Program Electives: Most four-year colleges require two years of a foreign language. It is recommended that students complete or begin foreign language study at Holyoke Community College.