Courses & Programs

Supervision & Leadership in the Helping Professions Certificate

Allison Hrovat

Faculty, Human Services

Social Sciences

Donahue 261

413.552.2381 (Tel)


what will you learn?

Direct support staff in the human service field are often promoted into supervisory and leadership positions with no direct experience or education to support their success in that role. The human service industry has recognized a need to provide appropriate education to individuals in supervisory and leadership roles in order to promote their success, and the success of the staff they supervise. Human service supervisors work in a variety of settings, such as group homes, vocational programs, after school programs, nursing homes, shelters for the homeless, and correctional facilities. The populations served may include individuals with cognitive and intellectual disabilities individuals with mental health issues, children and youth, the elderly, individuals with substance abuse issues, individuals who are homeless, and victims of domestic violence.

This 24-credit certificate is appropriate for staff in human service programs who have been promoted into supervisory positions and want to upgrade their skills and knowledge or those individuals who aspire to move into a supervisory and leadership role.

The certificate is designed to strengthen writing, problem-solving, and critical thinking skills by including readings, assignments, and discussion of the daily experiences, challenges, and concerns of front line supervisors. The courses in the Certificate can be transferred into the AS in Human Services Program.

what will you do?

Continue your education at a four-year college or university, or enter the workforce! Human service supervisors work in a variety of settings, such as group homes, vocational programs, after school programs, nursing homes, shelters for the homeless, and correctional facilities. The populations served may include individuals with cognitive and intellectual disabilities individuals with mental health issues, children and youth, the elderly, individuals with substance abuse issues, individuals who are homeless, and victims of domestic violence. 

Learn more at HCC's Advising, Career & Transfer Center and at What Can I Do With This Major?

24 total credits

Depending on course selection, approximately 80% of this program can be completed online.


program requirements

18 CREDITS
This course is the first half of the college composition sequence and focuses on close reading, critical thinking, beginning research skills, and the writing process. Students will read, analyze, and cite a range of nonfiction texts. Students will produce several formal essays totaling approximately 3000 words. Prerequisite: Appropriate scores on English placement tests or C- or higher in ENG 095.
Introduction to the study and principles of behavior. Topics include general principles of scientific investigation; physiological bases of behavior including sensation, perception, learning, emotion, and motivation; development; individual differences; attitudes; and group dynamics. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101.
An orientation to human services. Particular emphasis on motivation for working in human services, personal attitudes and values, consumer empowerment, inclusion, and multicultural issues. Also includes a history of human services, an overview of the American human services systems, and an introduction to local human service agencies. There is a required Community Service Learning component. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101
This course helps the student develop the knowledge, skills and personal characteristics that are critical for an effective helping relationship. Students will explore helper attitudes and values, increase awareness of themselves and others, and develop active listening, empowerment, case management, and crisis intervention skills. Course material is built upon research about human behavior, life stage theory, intervention strategies and strength-based practice. Prerequisite: HSV 113 and PSY 110
Provides an understanding of the relationship between the behaviors of workers and their human service agencies, and how such agencies might function more efficiently. Particular attention is paid to hiring, training, supervision, work conditions, and productivity. In addition to group and managerial settings and roles, there is some focus on individual clerical responsibilities, proper documentation of services, and general communication skills. Prerequisite: HSV 113 or permission of instructor
An introductory course for supervisors in the helping professions, designed to develop the knowledge, skills, and attitudes needed for individuals in supervisory roles. Common threads throughout the course include ethics, cultural competency, belief systems, developing relationships, supervisory/leadership style, developing and working with teams. Prerequisites: HSV 113 and Eligibility for ENG 101

electives

6 CREDITS
This course serves as an exploration, inquiry and analysis of the complexities of cultural diversity in the United States. While cultural diversity in the U.S. tends to focus on ethnic and racial minorities, this class will not be limited to such a narrow definition and instead will discuss various forms of difference including race, class, gender, age, ability, sexual orientation and religion. This class will discuss the racial experience in America by learning about the heritage of Native Americans, African Americans, Latinos and Asian Americans in relation to the historically dominant group, whites. Acknowledging that a class on diversity is about understanding the various forms of difference outside of race {for example, social class, religion, gender, age, ability and sexual orientation} that exist and are often ignored and/or downplayed. We will also identify how socially constructed markers of difference have been organized in U.S. society. This multilayered analysis will allow students to also explore their differences and the role of contemporary discussions of difference in defining their lives.Prerequisite: None
Critically examines the cycle of conflict in western society and provides an overview of traditional and alternative strategies of conflict resolution, including mediation. The complexities of power imbalances and cultural differences are explored within the frameworks of personal and structural conflict. Conflict is viewed as an opportunity for growth and empowerment, rather than merely as a problem to be solved. Students learn conflict resolution and mediation skills that are transferable to work, home and school.

Take your pick from our HSV, DVD or GRT course offerings.

Take your pick from our HSV, DVD or GRT course offerings.



CORI (Criminal Offender Record Information) and SORI (Sexual Offender Registry Information) background checks may be required prior to field work and will be conducted by specific agencies in accordance with state regulations. CORI and SORI results are confidential.